Contents

1                      Introduction                                                      

1.1                   Background                                                       

1.2                   The Updated EM&A Manual                           

1.3                   Purpose of the EM&A Manual                     

2                      Project Description                                      

2.1                   General Description of the Project     

2.2                   Designated Project                                       

2.3                   Concurrent Projects                                   

2.4                   Construction Programme                          

3                      Project Organisation                                   

3.1                   Project Organisation                                   

4                      Environmental Submission                         

4.1                   Introduction                                                      

4.2                   Environmental Management Plan           

4.3                   Waste Management Plan                              

4.4                   Construction Method Statement            

5                      Air Quality Impact                                           

5.1                   Introduction                                                      

5.2                   Mitigation Measures                                      

5.3                   Air Quality Parameters                                

5.4                   Monitoring Equipment                                   

5.5                   Proposal of Use of Portable Direct Reading Dust Meter and Existing Wind Data from Chek Lap Kok Wind Station       

5.6                   Laboratory Measurement / Analysis    

5.7                   Monitoring Locations                                   

5.8                   Baseline Monitoring                                      

5.9                   Impact Monitoring                                           

5.10                 Action and Limit Levels                                 

5.11                 Event and Action Plan                                  

6                      Noise Impact                                                       

6.1                   Introduction                                                      

6.2                   Mitigation Measures                                      

6.3                   Noise Monitoring Parameters                   

6.4                   Monitoring Equipment                                   

6.5                   Monitoring Locations                                   

6.6                   Baseline Monitoring                                      

6.7                   Impact Monitoring                                           

6.8                   Action and Limit Levels                                 

6.9                   Event and Action Plan                                  

7                      Water Quality Impact                                    

7.1                   Introduction                                                      

7.2                   Mitigation Measures                                      

7.3                   Water Monitoring Parameters                 

7.4                   Monitoring Equipment                                   

7.5                   Laboratory Measurement / Analysis    

7.6                   Monitoring Locations                                   

7.7                   Baseline Monitoring                                      

7.8                   Impact Monitoring                                           

7.9                   Action and Limit Levels                                 

7.10                 Event and Action Plan                                  

8                      Sewage & Sewerage Treatment Implications  

8.1                   Introduction                                                      

8.2                   Mitigation Measures                                      

9                      Waste Management Implications             

9.1                   Introduction                                                      

9.2                   Mitigation Measures                                      

9.3                   Waste EM&A Requirements                          

9.4                   Site Audit Requirements                               

10                    Land Contamination Impact                        

10.1                 Introduction                                                      

10.2                 Proposed Site Investigation for Potentially Contaminated Areas                                                                     

10.3                 Submission Requirements of CAR, RAP and RR 

11                    Ecology                                                               

11.1                 Introduction                                                      

11.2                 Mitigation Measures                                      

11.3                 Audit Requirement                                          

11.4                 Monitoring Requirements                           

12                    Fisheries                                                              

12.1                 Introduction                                                      

12.2                 Mitigation Measures                                      

12.3                 Monitoring Requirements                           

12.4                 Audit Requirements                                        

13                    Landscape and Visual Impact                    

13.1                 Introduction                                                      

13.2                 Mitigation Measures                                      

13.3                 Baseline Monitoring                                      

13.4                 Environmental Monitoring and Audit Requirement

13.5                 Event and Action Plan                                  

14                    Impact on Cultural Heritage                    

14.1                 Terrestrial Archaeology                          

14.2                 Marine Archaeology                                     

14.3                 Built Heritage                                                   

15                    Site Environmental Audit                            

15.1                 Site Inspection                                                  

15.2                 Environmental Compliance                        

15.3                 Choice of Construction Method              

15.4                 Environmental Complaints                        

15.5                 Log-book                                                             

16                    Reporting                                                            

16.1                 General                                                                

16.2                 Baseline Monitoring Report                      

16.3                 Monthly Monitoring Reports                    

16.4                 Final EM&A Review Reports                         

16.5                 Data Keeping                                                      

16.6                 Interim Notifications of Environmental Quality Limit Exceedances                                                      

 

Appendices

Appendix 2.1        Tentative Construction Programme

Appendix 3.1        Project Organization for Environmental Works

Appendix 4.1        Environmental Mitigation Implementation Schedule (EMIS)

Appendix 5.1        Sample Data Sheet for TSP Monitoring

Appendix 6.1        Sample Data Sheet for Construction Noise Monitoring

Appendix 15.1      Proactive Environmental Protection Proforma

Appendix 15.2      Log-book Sample

Appendix 16.1      Sample Template for Interim Notification

 

1                                              Introduction

1.1                                        Background

The study in North Lantau including Tung Chung area started since the Port and Airport Development Strategy in 1989 for the study on the construction of replacement international airport at Chek Lap Kok.  Since then, various studies had been conducted including North Lantau Development Study in 1990, Territorial Development Strategic Review in 1996 and Remaining Development in Tung Chung and Tai Ho – Comprehensive Feasibility Study (CFS) in 1997.  The CFS in 1997 showed that it was feasible for Tung Chung and Tai Ho areas to accommodate a population target of about 334,000 in anticipation of the projected territory-wide demand by 2011 estimated at that time.  Phases 1, 2 and 3A of Tung Chung New Town were completed in 2003.

With the changes in planning circumstances and population target outlined in the above paragraph, the Tung Chung New Town Extension Study focuses on the remaining development of Tung Chung covering possible development areas (PDAs) at Tung Chung East (TCE) and Tung Chung West (TCW) to meet the territorial long-term housing, social, economic and environmental needs with existing and committed developments in existing Tung Chung New Town being taken as the given constraints in general.  The study is also required to review and establish the feasibility of the remaining development of Tung Chung as well as to prepare documents to meet the relevant statutory requirements.

A previous Project Profile (No. PP-470/2012) for the Tung Chung New Town Development Extension was submitted on 16 July 2012 and an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Study Brief (SB) (EIA SB No. ESB-251/2012) was subsequently issued on 28 August 2012 under the EIA Ordinance (EIAO).  Since then, the Project Proponent has been proactively conducting a series of public engagement exercises (including forums and workshops) to collate views and opinions from stakeholders, green groups and local communities etc.  In parallel to the public engagement process, the planning and engineering designs of the project have also been progressing and evolving to address various constraints and development needs as well as the comments collated in public engagement exercises.

These comments have been appropriately considered in formulating the Recommended Outline Development Plan (RODP).  As such, the original PDA boundaries as presented in the previous EIA SB (EIA SB No.: ESB-251/2012) are refined and a number of associated infrastructures would also be required to support the development within the RODP.  The key changes include the following:

·             Withdrawal of 50ha reclamation at TCW as proposed in Stage 2 Public Engagement;

·             Removal of possible theme park/ major recreational uses at TCE;

·             Addition of marina; and

·             Addition of associated infrastructures.

Because of the abovementioned changes in project elements, the Project Proponent had submitted another Project Profile (No. PP-519/2014) for application of a new EIA SB on 17 December 2014.  The Director of Environmental Protection (DEP) then issued an EIA SB (EIA SB No.: ESB-283/2014) on 28 January 2015 under the EIAO.

During the public inspection period of the Project Profile (PP-519/2014), comments from the public were received and had been considered and incorporated as appropriate in the EIA SB (ESB-283/2014) issued on 28 January 2015.  Nevertheless, the Project Proponent had also pro-actively reviewed those comments and had studied to make provisions for the possible elements which could further enhance the development plan from environmental perspective.  As such, a revised Project Profile for this study (No. PP-523/2015) for application of a new EIA SB had been submitted on 18 March 2015.  The DEP then issued an EIA SB (EIA SB No.: ESB-285/2015) on 17 April 2015 under the EIAO.

The EIA Report for Tung Chung New Town Extension (TCNTE) (Register No. AEIAR-196/2016) was approved on 8 April 2016 and the Environmental Permit (EP) EP-519/2016, covering the construction and operation of TCNTE was granted on 9 August 2016.  The EIA Report and EP cover both TCE and TCW.

The location of the Project is shown in Figure 1.1.  In addition, there are also associated infrastructure works (e.g. drainage connection, fresh water supply, flushing water supply) required to support the development and the respective pipe networks are illustrated in Figure 1.2.

Descriptions of the Project elements have been further elaborated and presented in Section 2.1.

1.2                                        The Updated EM&A Manual

The EM&A Manual is an evolving document that should be updated to maintain its relevance as the Project progresses to ensure the impacts predicted and the recommended mitigation measures remain consistent and appropriate to the manner in which the works are to be carried out.  This updated submission incorporates the update as required under Condition 3.1 of the EP, including:

l   Updates on the project organization chart together with Event and Action Plans under the EM&A programme in accordance with Conditions 2.2 to 2.10 of the EP (see Section 3 of this EM&A Manual);

l   Updates on the works vessel travel routes, deployment of silt curtain(s), post-planting monitoring and maintenance, use of new low noise road surfacing material(s) as well as follow-up actions to be taken by the Contractor and dump truck drivers in case of illegal dumping and landfilling of C&D materials in the Environmental Mitigation Implementation Schedule in accordance with Conditions 2.13, 2.16, 2.22, 2.23 and 2.24 of the EP respectively (see Appendix 4.1 of this EM&A Manual);

l   Reporting of actions taken under the Complaint Management Plan in accordance with Condition 2.1 of the EP (see Section 15.4 of this EM&A Manual); and

l   A format of the log-book as stated in Condition 2.3(v) of the EP (see Section 15.5 of this EM&A Manual).

In addition, baseline monitoring for air quality (in Section 5) and construction noise (in Section 6) have been reviewed due to the absence of reclaimed land at TCE.  The monitoring locations for water quality monitoring are also reviewed in Section 7.  In addition, this Updated EM&A Manual describes the sampling design of soft shore ecological monitoring at Tung Chung Bay and Tai Ho Bay in Section 11.4.7

1.3                                        Purpose of the EM&A Manual

The purposes of this EM&A Manual are to:

·             Guide the set up of an EM&A programme to ensure compliance with the EIA recommendations;

·             Specify the requirements for monitoring equipment;

·             Propose environmental monitoring points, monitoring frequency etc;

·             Propose Action and Limit Levels; and

·             Propose Event and Action Plans.

This EM&A Manual outlines the monitoring and audit programme for the construction and operation of the proposed Project and provides systematic procedures for monitoring, auditing and minimizing environmental impacts.

This EM&A Manual has been prepared in accordance with the requirements stipulated in Annex 21 of the Technical Memorandum on the EIA Process (TM-EIAO).

This EM&A Manual contains the following information:

·             Responsibilities of the Contractor, the Engineer or Engineer’s Representative (ER), Environmental Team (ET), and the Independent Environmental Checker (IEC) under the context of EM&A;

·             Project organization for the EM&A works;

·             The basis for, and description of the broad approach underlying the EM&A programme;

·             Details of the methodologies to be adopted, including all laboratories and analytical procedures, and details on quality assurance and quality control programme;

·             The rationale on which the environmental monitoring data will be evaluated and interpreted;

·             Definition of Action and Limit Levels;

·             Establishment of Event and Action Plans;

·             Requirements for reviewing pollution sources and working procedures required in the event of non-compliance with the environmental criteria and complaints; and

·             Requirements for presentation of environmental monitoring and audit data and appropriate reporting procedures.

For the purpose of this EM&A Manual, the ER shall refer to the Engineer as defined in the Construction Contract, in cases where the Engineer’s powers have been delegated to the ER, in accordance with the Construction Contract. The ET leader, who shall be responsible for and in charge of the ET, shall refer to the person delegated the role of executing the environmental monitoring and audit requirements.

2                                              Project Description

2.1                                        General Description of the Project

As described in the EP (EP-519/2016), the Project (including the elements for TCE and TCW) mainly comprises the following elements:

·             129.1 ha reclamation area (120.5 ha for TCE and 8.6 ha for the Road P1 (Tung Chung – Tai Ho Section));

·             124.5 ha existing land (4 ha for TCE, 0.5 ha for the Road P1 (Tung Chung – Tai Ho Section) and 120 ha for TCW));

·             Construction of a Primary Distributor Road with total length of approximate 1.6km connecting Tung Chung to Tai Ho to support further development in Tung Chung;

·             Construction of District Distributor Roads with total length of approximate 3.5km within PDAs at TCE and TCW;

·             Construction of sewage pumping stations, some with individual capacity more than 2,000m3/day within PDAs at TCE and TCW;

·             Upgrading the existing Chung Mun Road Sewage Pumping Station from existing capacity of 12,360m3/day to a proposed capacity of approximately 20,660m3/day;

·             Land formation of a marina with about 95 berths at the PDA at TCE as part of the reclamation;

·             Land formation  of an outdoor sporting facility with a capacity of over 10,000 persons at the PDA at TCE as part of the reclamation;

·             Land formation of a petrol filling station with an area of about 800m2 at the PDA at TCE as part of the reclamation;

·             Construction of two service reservoirs, including one for fresh water and the other for flushing water, with capacities of 55,000 m3 and 11,000 m3 respectively;

·             Construction of about 4 km long of dual rising mains at TCE connecting a proposed sewage pumping station within the PDA at TCE to the existing Siu Ho Wan (SHW) Sewage Treatment Works (STW);

·             Construction of waterfront promenade at the coastal area of proposed Town Park at the PDA at TCW;

·             Revitalisation of the existing channelized section of Tung Chung Stream at the PDA at TCW and partly proposed as River Park;

·             Proposed River Park in the land adjacent to the immediate upstream of the channelized section of Tung Chung Stream up to Shek Mun Kap at the PDA at TCW;

·             A comprehensive network of cycle track (about 12km long in total length) along the proposed distributor roads, waterfront promenade, walkways and along future Road P1 (Tung Chung – Tai Ho Section);

·             Land formation of a possible cycle park with an area of approximately 1.4ha surrounded by the slip roads connecting the future Tai Ho Interchange to integrate with the cycle tracks in TCE for forming a better cycle track network as part of the reclamation;

·             Provision of Sustainable urban drainage system within TCW which comprises dual-purpose stormwater attenuation and treatment ponds;

·             Provision of sewerage system for the existing unsewered villages and proposed residential developments within TCW; and

·             Space provisions of facilities for possible green initiatives such as regional energy efficiency system and environmentally friendly transport systems (e.g. electric buses, electric cars and bicycle sharing system), etc. to promote environmental performance. (Note: The initiative of District Cooling System (DCS) in Tung Chung will be separately considered. Should the initiative is to be put forward in future, the DCS will be implemented under separate project subject to further study.)

In addition, there are also associated infrastructure works (e.g. drainage connection, fresh water supply, flushing water supply) required to support the development. The respective pipe networks are illustrated in Figure 1.2.

According to the latest arrangement, the construction of two possible railway stations, with one at TCE and the other one at TCW, will be carried out by the rail operator and hence will not be covered under this Project.  Since the railway system including railway stations and railway lines is a Designated Project (DP) under the EIAO, the rail operator shall conduct a separate EIA under the EIAO.

2.2                                        Designated Project

The Study is a Designated Project (DP) under Item 1 Schedule 3 of EIAO - Engineering feasibility study of urban development projects with a study area covering more than 20 ha or involving a total population of more than 100,000. For any future change(s) after the approval of this EIA report, the following steps will be taken:

a)       Should the change(s) involve(s) a designated project item under Schedule 2 of the EIAO, the requirements under the EIAO will be complied with; and

b)       Should the change(s) not involve any designated project items under Schedule 2 of the EIAO, prevailing planning mechanisms and standards will be followed and relevant EIA findings will be conformed to.”

According to the RODP, a number of work components would fall under various Schedule 2 DPs categories.  A list of Schedule 2 DPs is summarised in Table 2.1 below and are further described in the sequent sections.  The locations of these DPs under the Project are shown in Figure 2.1.

Table 2.1        Summary of Schedule 2 DPs

Ref. Category No.

Designated Projects

Ref. in RODP

Environmental Permit (EP) Holder

 

Part I, A.1

Primary distributor roads and district distributor roads

Proposed road networks within PDA at TCE and TCW, Road P1 (Tung Chung to Tai Ho Section) and Chung Mun Road

CEDD [1]

 

Part I, A.8

A road more than 100m in length between abutments

The 400m long viaduct section of Road P1 (Tung Chung to Tai Ho Section) connecting to Tai Ho Interchange

CEDD [1]

 

Part I, C.l

Reclamation works (including associated dredging works) more than 5 ha in size

Reclamation area at TCE together with the necessary reclamation for Road P1 extension

CEDD

 

Part I, F.3(b)

Sewage pumping stations with installed capacity of more than 2000m3/d located at less than 150m from existing/ planned receivers

Proposed sewage pumping stations within PDA at TCE and TCW

CEDD [1]

 

Part I, I.1(b)

A drainage channel or river training and diversion works which discharges or discharge into an area which is less than 300m from the nearest boundary of a planned conservation area and coastal protection area

Revitalisation of the existing channelized section of Tung Chung Stream at the PDA at TCW and possible drainage outlets of the sustainable urban drainage system

CEDD [1]

 

Part I, Q.1

Any works partly or wholly in a gazette proposed conservation area

Earthworks within CA zone

CEDD [1]

 

Note: [1] CEDD will liaise with the relevant departments for transfer of the operation responsibilities of these DPs through Further Environmental Permits.

2.2.1                                 Part I, A.1 - Primary distributor roads and district distributor roads

The internal roads in TCE consist of 4 district distributors with 2 lanes per direction and a number of local distributors with single lane per direction. Most of the internal roads are constructed at-grade, except a section of approximately 140m long in a form as a depressed road in order to encourage through pedestrian walking across the town centre and hence minimise the environmental impact. While in TCW, the internal roads consist of district and local distributors with typical at-grade road construction except the bridge structures across Tung Chung Stream. The existing Chung Mun Road will be extended to serve as a district distributor with two lanes per direction, while the local distributors will be single lane road. The remaining roads in the TCW development are local distributors that provide links to specific land parcels within the development. In terms of existing roads in the vicinity of the TCW development, Tung Chung Road will be maintained as a two-lane (both direction) rural road, while Yu Tung Road (district distributor) and Chung Yan Road (local distributor) will be two lanes per direction. In addition, the Road P1 (Tung Chung to Tai Ho Section) itself is a primary distributor road.

2.2.2                                 Part I, A.8 - A road more than 100m in length between abutments

Road P1 (Tung Chung to Tai Ho Section) aims to connect the existing Ying Hei Road to the proposed Tai Ho Interchange to serve the major external highway connection for TCE. The Road P1 comprises 3 elements: 1) 1km at-graded road, 2) one at-graded roundabout and 3) a viaduct section of approximately 400m connecting the Tai Ho Interchange.

2.2.3                                 Part I, C.1 - Reclamation works (including associated dredging works) more than 5 ha in size

As mentioned in Section 2.1, the Project involves a reclamation of 120.5 hectare of land for formation of TCE and 8.6 hectare of land for extension of Road P1 (Tung Chung to Tai Ho Section).

2.2.4                                 Part I, F.3(b) - Sewage pumping stations with installed capacity of more than 2000m3/d located at less than 150m from existing/ planned receivers

Land parcels with “Government” landuse have been reserved in the development to provide governmental facilities including sewage pumping station (SPS), sports grounds/ sports centre, clinic etc to support the development. According to the RODP, 2 SPSs and 4 SPSs will be proposed at TCE and TCW respectively, in which 5 of them, including TCE SPS (North), TCE SPS (West), TCV SPS (East), TCV SPS (West) and upgraded Chung Mun Road SPS as shown in Figure 1.1, have an individual capacity over 2,000m3/day.

 

2.2.5                                 Part I, I.1(b) - A drainage channel or river training and diversion works which discharges or discharge into an area which is less than 300m from the nearest boundary of a planned conservation area and coastal protection area

As highlighted in 2015 Policy Address, the government is promoting the concept of revitalising water bodies in large-scale drainage improvement works and planning drainage networks. In order to enhance the ecological connection between the upstream and downstream of Tung Chung Stream, it is proposed to revitalise the existing channelized section of Tung Chung Stream with a total length of approximately 625m long.

In addition, though the detailed design of the sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) is yet to be confirmed and will be subject to further design, there is a possibility that the drainage outlet of the SUDS will be assigned within the Conservation Area (CA) or Coastal Protection Area (CPA) zone to discharge the treated runoff to the Tung Chung Stream.

2.2.6                                 Part I, Q.1 – Any works partly or wholly in a gazette proposed conservation area

While the amount of works within CA or CPA zone would be minimized, there is still a possibility that minor earthworks would be required partly or wholly within the CA or CPA zone.

2.2.7                                 Possible Minor Works

It should also be noted that minor maintenance works including minor works to connection roads, minor public utility works (e.g. installation of telecommunication wires), earthworks relating to agriculture, footpaths/ trails and facilities relating to sitting out areas, provision of water pipes etc would be anticipated within the proposed conservation areas and sites of cultural heritage. However, according to the Schedule 2 of the EIAO, these minor works are not classified as designated project items and thus EP application is not required.

The locations of these DPs under the Project are shown in Figure 2.1.

2.3                                        Concurrent Projects

In order to assess the cumulative impacts, a review of best available information to identify a number of other projects that are undergoing planning, design, construction and/or operation within the construction and/or operation period for this Study has been conducted and a list of the tentative concurrent projects identified at this stage is summarised below and Figure 2.2 shows the locations of these concurrent projects.

·             Construction of additional sewage rising mains and rehabilitation of the existing sewage rising main between Tung Chung and Siu Ho Wan;

·             Hong Kong - Zhuhai - Macao Bridge Hong Kong Boundary Crossing Facilities (HZMB HKBCF);

·             Hong Kong - Zhuhai - Macao Bridge Hong Kong Link Road (HZMB HKLR);

·             Tuen Mun - Chek Lap Kok Link (TM-CLKL);

·             Proposed New Contaminated Mud Marine Disposal Facility at Airport East / East Sha Chau Area;

·             Integration of Siu Ho Wan and Silver Mine Bay Water Treatment Works;

·             Organic Waste Treatment Facilities Phase 1 (OWTF);

·             Possible Lantau Logistics Park;

·             Expansion of Hong Kong International Airport into a Three-Runway System (3RS);

·             Further Landscape Enhancement to NLH;

·             Planned developments in the existing Tung Chung New Town such as residential developments at Tung Chung Area 27, Area 39, Area 54, Area 55 and Area 56 and hotel development at Tung Chung Area 53a;

·             Greening Master Plans for New Territories South West – Investigation, Design and Construction;

·             North Commercial District (NCD) of Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA);

·             Dredging, Management and Capping of Contaminated Sediment Disposal Facility to the South of The Brothers;

·             The Brothers Marine Park (BMP);

·             Topside Development at HZMB HKBCF;

·             Cumulative Environmental Impact Assessment Study for the Three Potential Nearshore Reclamation Sites in the Western Waters of Hong Kong;

·             Harbour Area Treatment Scheme (HATS) Stage 2A;

·             Providing Sufficient Water Depth for Kwai Tsing Container Basin and its Approach Channel;

·             Cross Boundary Hub in Siu Ho Wan;

·             Leisure and Entertainment Node at Sunny Bay;

·             Marina in TCE;

·             Sports ground in TCE; and

·             Proposed Railway Station at TCE and TCW.

2.4                                        Construction Programme

According to the current information, the Tung Chung New Town Extension will be commissioned in phases with first population intake in Year 2023.  The construction work is targeted to commence in Year 2018 and completed by Year 2030 for full population intake.  The implementation programme is shown in Appendix 2.1.

Summary of construction period of the key construction works is summarized in Table 2.2 below.

Table 2.2        Summary of Key Construction Works

Stages

Key Construction Works

Construction Period

Reclamation Works

Reclamation Works

·             Tung Chung East Reclamation

·             Box Culvert Extension

·             Road P1 (Tung Chung – Tai Ho Section) Reclamation

·             Mid 2018 to Late 2023

 

 

 

Tung Chung East

Infrastructure Works

·             Road Networks and Cycle Tracks in TCE

·             Road P1 (Tung Chung – Tai Ho Section) roadworks, Slip Roads and Tai Ho Interchange

·             Cycle Track at Road P1 (Tung Chung – Tai Ho Section)

·             Fresh Water Supply w/ pipelines in TCE

·             Salt Water Supply w/ pipelines in TCE

·             Saltwater In-take Pumping Station

·             Drainage w/ pipelines in TCE

·             Sewerage w/ pipelines in TCE

·             New Sewage Pumping Station - TCE West SPS

·             New Sewage Pumping Station - TCE East SPS

·             Freshwater and Saltwater Service Reservoirs

·             Early 2020 to Early 2030

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tung Chung West

Infrastructures

·             Road Networks and Cycle Track in TCW

·             Fresh Water Supply w/ pipelines in TCW

·             Salt Water Supply w/ pipelines in TCW

·             Drainage w/ pipelines in TCW

·             Sustainable urban drainage system and pumping stations for TCW

·             Polder Scheme for TCW

·             De-channalisation of channelised portion of Tung Chung Stream and River Park

·             Sewerage w/ pipelines in TCW

·             New Sewage Pumping Station

·             Upgrading Existing Sewage Pumping Station – TCW – CMRSPS

·             Site Formation in TCW

·             Early 2020 to Late 2026

 

Population intake for the proposed new development area in TCE and TCW will be implemented in phases together with the supporting infrastructures.  Based on the implementation of the supporting infrastructures, the proposed new development will be available for the population intake as listed in the summary of the schedule of the population intake in Table 2.3.  It is the prediction based on the early availability of land and phase completion of the supporting infrastructure to support the population and will still be subject to change according to the latest implementation programme and government policy.  Locations of development phasing in TCE and TCW are illustrated in Figures 2.3a and 2.3b.

Table 2.3         Population Intake Summary

Phase

Year of Population Intake

Population Intake (Approximate)

Cumulative Population Intake (Approximate)

Tung Chung East

Phase 1

2023

23,900

23,900

Phase 2

2025

13,700

37,600

Phase 3

2027

37,000

74,600

Phase 4

2029 - 2030

44,300

118,900

Tung Chung West

Phase 1

2023

19,200

19,200

Phase 2

2026 to 2030

6,300

25,500

 

 

3                                              Project Organisation

3.1                                        Project Organisation

The proposed project organization and lines of communication with respect to environmental protection works are shown in Appendix 3.1.

A single full time on-site ET shall be employed by CEDD, shall be directly supervised by the ER and shall not be in any way an associated body of the Contractor or the IEC for the Project.  The ET shall be headed by a full time on-site ET Leader. The ET Leader shall be a person who has at least 7 years of experience in environmental monitoring and auditing (EM&A) or environmental management.

A single full time on-site IEC with a supporting team shall be employed by CEDD.  The IEC and his team shall not be in any way an associated body of the ER, the Contractor or the ET for the Project.  The IEC shall be approved by EPD before appointment by the Permit Holder.  The IEC shall be a person who has at least 7 years of experience in EM&A or environmental management.

Qualified Ecologist(s) shall be appointed by CEDD to form part of the ET to carry out work relating to ecological aspects including but not limited to dolphin monitoring, amphibian monitoring, and post-planting/transplanting monitoring and to prepare submissions for the Project as required under Conditions 2.13 to 2.22 of the EP respectively.  Each Qualified Ecologist shall be a person who has at least 5 years of relevant experience.  The qualification and experience of the Qualified Ecologist(s) shall be certified by the ET Leader and verified by the IEC.

Surveillance Team shall be employed by CEDD to form part of the ET to conduct regular site inspections to identify and report immediately to the IEC, the ER and the Director on suspected illegal dumping and landfilling of construction and demolition (C&D) materials within the Project site throughout the construction phase.  Each member of the Surveillance Team shall be a person who has at least 3 years of experience in EM&A or environmental management.  The qualification and experience of the members of the Surveillance Team shall be certified by the ET Leader and verified by the IEC.

The responsibilities of respective parties are:

The Contractor

·             Implement the EIA recommendations and requirements;

·             Employ an ET to undertake monitoring, laboratory analysis and reporting of environmental monitoring and audit;

·             Provide assistance to ET in carrying out monitoring and auditing;

·             Submit proposals on mitigation measures in case of exceedances of Action and Limit Levels in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·             Implement measures to reduce impact where Action and Limit Levels are exceeded; and

·             Adhere to the agreed procedures for carrying out compliant investigation.

Environmental Team

·             Set up all the required environmental monitoring stations;

·             Monitor various environmental parameters as required in the EM&A Manual;

·             Analyse the environmental monitoring and audit data, review the success of EM&A programme, confirm the adequacy of mitigation measures implemented and the validity of the EIA predictions, and to identify any adverse environmental impacts arising;

·             Carry out site inspection to investigate and audit the Contractors’ site practice, equipment and work methodologies with respect to pollution control and environmental mitigation measures, and take proactive actions to pre-empt problems;

·             Audit and prepare audit reports on the environmental monitoring data and site environmental conditions;

·             Report on the environmental monitoring and audit results to the IEC, Contractor, the ER and EPD or its delegated representative;

·             Recommend suitable mitigation measures to the Contractor in the case of exceedance of Action and Limit Levels in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·             Undertake regular on-site audits / inspections and report to the Contractor and the ER of any potential non-compliance;

·             Follow up and close out non-compliance actions; and

·             Adhere to the procedures for carrying out environmental complaint investigation.

Engineer or Engineer’s Representative

·             Supervise the Contractor’s activities and ensure that the requirements in the EM&A Manual are fully complied with;

·             Inform the Contractor when action is required to reduce impacts in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·             Assist the Project Proponent in employing an IEC to audit the results of the EM&A works carried out by the ET;

·             Comply with the agreed Event Contingency Plan in the event of any exceedance;

·             Adhere to the procedures for carrying out complaint investigations.

Independent Environmental Checker

·             Review the EM&A works performed by the ET (at not less than monthly intervals);

·             Audit the monitoring activities and results (at not less than monthly intervals);

·             Validate and confirm the accuracy of monitoring results, monitoring equipment, monitoring locations, monitoring procedures and location of sensitive receivers;

·             Report the audit results to the ER and EPD in parallel;

·             Review the EM&A reports (monthly and quarterly summary reports) submitted by the ET;

·             Review the proposal on mitigation measures submitted by the Contractor in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·             Check the mitigation measures submitted by the Contractor in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·             Check the mitigation measures that have been recommended in the EIA and this Manual, and ensure they are properly implemented in a timely manner, when necessary; and

·             Report the findings of site inspections and other environmental performance reviews to ER and EPD.

Sufficient and suitably qualified professional and technical staff shall be employed by the respective parties to ensure full compliance with their duties and responsibilities, as required under the EM&A programme for the duration of the Project.

 

 

4                                              Environmental Submission

4.1                                        Introduction

The Contractor shall prepare the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) (including a Waste Management Plan (WMP)), Construction Method Statement prior to the commencement of construction works and obtain approval from ER and IEC and other relevant authorities to encompass the recommended environmental protection / mitigation measures with respect to their latest construction methodology and programme.

4.2                                        Environmental Management Plan

A systematic EMP shall be set up by the Contractor to ensure effective implementation of the mitigation measures, monitoring and remedial requirements presented in EIA, EM&A and Environmental Mitigation Implementation Schedule (EMIS) (See Appendix 4.1).  The ER and the IEC will audit the implementation status against the EMP and advise the necessary remedial actions required.  These remedial actions shall be enforced by the ER through contractual means.

The EMP will require the Contractor (together with its sub-contractors) to define in details how to implement the recommended mitigation measures in order to achieve the environmental performance defined in the Hong Kong environmental legislation and the EIA documentation.

The review of on-site environmental performance shall be undertaken by ER and IEC through a systematic checklist and audit once the construction works commences. The environmental performance review programme comprises a regular assessment on the effectiveness of the EMP. Reference should be made to ETWB TC(W) No. 19 / 2005 “Environmental Management on Construction Sites” or its latest versions, and any other relevant Technical Circulars.

4.3                                        Waste Management Plan

As part of EMP, the Contractor shall include WMP for the construction of the project and prior to the commencement of construction works submit to the ER and IEC for approval.  Where waste generation is unavoidable, the opportunities for recycling or reusing should be maximized.  If wastes cannot be recycled, recommendations for appropriate disposal routes should be provided in the WMP.  A method statement for stockpiling and transportation of the excavated materials and other construction wastes should also be included in the WMP and be approved before the commencement of construction works.  All mitigation measures arising from the approved WMP shall be fully implemented.

For the purpose of enhancing the management of Construction and Demolition (C&D) materials including rock, and minimizing its generation at source, construction works would be undertaken in accordance with the Section 4.1.3 of Chapter 4 in the Project Administration Handbook for Civil Engineering Works (PAH).

4.4                                        Construction Method Statement

In case the Contractor would like to adopt alternative construction methods or implementation schedules, it is required to submit details of methodology and equipment to the ER for approval before the work commences.  Any changes in construction method shall be reflected in a revised EMP or the Contractor will be required to demonstrate the manner in which the existing EMP should accommodate the proposed changes.  The Contractor may need to apply for a Variation of Environmental Permit (VEP) from EPD before commencement of any construction activities.

5                                              Air Quality Impact

5.1                                        Introduction

The EIA has considered the potential air quality impacts during both the construction and operational phases of the Project.  Fugitive dust and vehicular emission would be the key impacts during the construction phase and operational phase respectively.

5.2                                        Mitigation Measures

The EIA Report has recommended dust control measures including watering all works area once per hour during working hours.  Mitigation measures are not required for the operational phase. All the proposed mitigation measures are summarized in the Environmental Mitigation Implementation Schedule (EMIS) in Appendix 4.1.

5.3                                        Air Quality Parameters

Monitoring and audit of the Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) levels shall be carried out by the ET to ensure that any deteriorating air quality could be readily detected and timely action taken to rectify the situation.

One-hour TSP levels shall be measured to indicate the impacts of construction dust on air quality.  The 1-hour TSP levels could be measured by following the standard high volume sampling method as set out in the Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1 (Part 50), Appendix B.  Upon approval of the IEC, 1-hour TSP levels can be measured by direct reading method which are capable of producing comparable results as that by the high volume sampling method, to indicate short event impacts.

All relevant data including weather conditions, and any other local atmospheric factors affecting or affected by site conditions, etc., shall be recorded down in detail. A sample data sheet is shown in Appendix 5.1.

5.4                                        Monitoring Equipment

The following specifications shall be complied should high volume samplers (HVSs) be used for carrying out the 1-hour TSP monitoring:

·             0.6 – 1.7 m3 per minute adjustable flow range;

·             Equipped with a timing / control device with +/- 5 minutes accuracy for 24 hours operations;

·             Installed with elapsed-time meter with +/- 2 minutes accuracy for 24 hours operation;

·             Capable of providing a minimum exposed area of 406 cm2;

·             Flow control accuracy: +/- 2.5% deviation over 24-hour sampling period;

·             Equipped with a shelter to protect the filer and sampler;

·             Incorporated with an electronic mass flow rate controller or other equivalent devices;

·             Equipped with a flow recorder for continuous monitoring;

·             Provided with a peaked roof inlet;

·             Incorporated with a manometer;

·             Able to hold and seal the filter paper to the sampler housing at horizontal position;

·             Easily changeable filter; and

·             Capable of operating continuously for a 24-hour period.

The ET is responsible for the provision, installation, operation, maintenance, dismantle of the monitoring equipment.  They shall ensure that sufficient number of HVSs with an appropriate calibration kit is available for carrying out the baseline monitoring, regular impact monitoring and ad hoc monitoring.  The HVSs shall be equipped with an electronic mass flow controller and be calibrated against a traceable standard at regular intervals. All the equipment, calibration kit, filter papers, etc., shall be clearly labelled.

Initial calibration of dust monitoring equipment shall be conducted upon installation and thereafter at fortnightly intervals.  The transfer standard shall be traceable to the internationally recognized primary standard and be calibrated annually.  The concern parties such as IEC shall properly document the calibration data for future reference.  All the data should be converted into standard temperature and pressure condition.

If the ET proposes to use a direct reading dust meter to measure 1-hour TSP levels, they shall submit sufficient information to the IEC to prove that the instrument is capable of achieving a comparable results to the HVS.  The instrument should also be calibrated regularly, and the 1-hour sampling shall be determined periodically by the HVS to check the validity and accuracy of the results measured by direct reading method.

Wind data monitoring equipment shall also be provided and set up for logging wind speed and wind direction near the dust monitoring locations.  The equipment installation location shall be proposed by the ET and agreed with the IEC.  For installation and operation of wind data monitoring equipment, the following points shall be observed:

·             The wind sensors should be installed at 10 m above ground so that they are clear of obstructions or turbulence caused by buildings;

·             The wind data should be captured by a data logger, the data shall be downloaded for analysis at least once a month;

·             The wind data monitoring equipment should be re-calibrated at least once every six months; and

·             Wind direction should be divided into 16 sectors of 22.5 degrees each.

In exceptional situations, the ET may propose alternative methods to obtain representative wind data upon approval from the ER and agreement from the IEC.

5.5                                        Proposal of Use of Portable Direct Reading Dust Meter and Existing Wind Data from Chek Lap Kok Wind Station

Further to the monitoring requirement as stated in Section 5.4, it is proposed to use portable direct reading dust meter to measure 1-hour TSP levels in undertaking the air quality monitoring for the Project.  The proposal was submitted to the IEC and obtained agreement from the IEC.  With the use of direct reading dust meter, it can also allow prompt and direct results for the EM&A reporting and the implementation of the event and action plan.  The portable direct reading dust meter will be calibrated every year against HVS to check the validity and accuracy of the results measured by direct reading method.

It is also proposed and agreed by the IEC to adopt the wind data at Chek Lap Kok collected from the Hong Kong Observatory rather than setting up wind data monitoring equipment based on the following justification:

·             The installation of wind sensors at 10 m above ground would involve construction of the underground foundation to support a 10 m metal pole.  According to the ET’s past experience, it may result in objection from the owners of the wind monitoring area, and thus it is considered not practicable.

·             The area covering the Chek Lap Kok wind station and the Tung Chung New Town Extension East is relatively flat (primarily reclaimed land and ocean), with no prominent barrier (e.g. mountain) identified between the Chek Lap Kok wind station and the Tung Chung New Town Extension East.  The wind field across this area is likely to be uniform.  Therefore, the wind data recorded at the Chek Lap Kok station is considered representative of the wind conditions at the proposed dust monitoring stations.

·             The wind data collected by the Hong Kong Observatory is widely adopted in many EM&A Projects, including the Expansion of Hong Kong International Airport into a Three-runway System.  The dataset is considered to be more robust and precise and it is readily available and accessible via the website of the Hong Kong Observatory.

5.6                                        Laboratory Measurement / Analysis

Should HVSs be used for the 1-hr TSP monitoring, a clean laboratory with constant temperature and humidity control, and equipped with necessary measuring and conditioning instruments to handle the dust samples collected, shall be available for sample analysis, and equipment calibration and maintenance.  The laboratory should be Hong Kong Laboratory Accreditation Scheme (HOKLAS) accredited.

If as site laboratory is set up or a non-HOKLAS accredited laboratory is hired for carrying out the laboratory analysis, the laboratory equipment shall be approved by the ER and the measurement procedures shall be demonstrated to the satisfaction of the ER and IEC.  IEC shall regularly audit to the measurement performed by the laboratory to ensure the accuracy of measurement results.  The ET Leader shall provide the ER with one copy of the Title 40 of Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1 (Part 50), Appendix B for his / her reference.

Filter paper of size 8” x 10” shall be labelled before sampling.  It shall be a clean filter paper with no pinholes, and shall be conditioned in a humidity-controlled chamber for over 24-hours and be pre-weighed before use for the sampling.

After sampling, the filter paper loaded with dust shall be kept in a clean and tightly sealed plastic bag.  The filter paper shall then be returned to the laboratory for reconditioning in the humidity-controlled chamber followed by accurate weighing by an electronic balance with readout down to 0.1 mg.  The balance shall be regularly calibrated against a traceable standard.

5.7                                        Monitoring Locations

Figure 5.1, Figure 5.1a-b and Table 5.1 shows the locations of the proposed construction dust monitoring stations.  The status and locations of dust sensitive receivers may change after issuing this manual.  If such cases exist, the ET Leader shall propose updated monitoring locations and seek approval from ER and agreement from the IEC.

Table 5.1         Construction Dust Monitoring Locations

ID

ASR ID

Location

Impact Monitoring Period

DM-1

P7

Tung Chung Area 56 – Planned Public Rental Housing Development

From commencement of construction period until flat intakes of TCE-7 and TCE-14

DM-2

TCE-7

Proposed Residential Development (B1-2)

From its flat intake until the end of construction period

DM-3

TCE-14

Proposed Residential Development (D2-2)

From its flat intake until the end of construction period

DM-4

TCE-24

Proposed Residential Development (A2-4)

From its flat intake until the end of construction period

DM-5

A33

Lung Tseung Tau

Entire construction period for Tung Chung West

DM-6

A39

Mo Ka

Entire construction period for Tung Chung West

 

When alternative monitoring locations are proposed, the proposed site should, as far as practicable:

·             be at the site boundary or such locations close to the major dust emission source;

·             be close to the sensitive receptors; and

·             take into account the prevailing meteorological conditions.

The ET shall agree with the ER in consultation with the IEC on the position of the HVS for the installation of the monitoring equipment should HVSs be used for the 1-hour TSP monitoring.  When positioning the samplers, the following points shall be noted:

·             a horizontal platform with appropriate support to secure the samplers against gusty wind should be provided;

·             no two samplers should be placed less than 2 meters apart;

·             the distance between the sampler and an obstacle, such as buildings, must be at least twice the height that the obstacle protrudes above the sampler;

·             a minimum of 2 meters of separation from walls, parapets and penthouses is required for rooftop samplers;

·             a minimum of 2 meters separation from any supporting structure, measured horizontally is required;

·             no furnace or incinerator flue is nearby;

·             airflow around the sampler is unrestricted;

·             the sampler is more than 20 meters from the dripline;

·             any wire fence and gate, to protect the sampler, should not cause any obstruction during monitoring;

·             permission must be obtained to set up the samplers and to obtain access to the monitoring stations; and

·             a secured supply of electricity is needed to operate the samplers.

The ET may, depending on site conditions and monitoring results, decide whether additional monitoring locations shall be included or any monitoring locations could be removed / relocated during any stage of the construction phase.

5.8                                        Baseline Monitoring

Baseline monitoring shall be carried out at all of the designated monitoring locations (see Table 5.1) for at least 14 consecutive days prior to the commissioning of major construction works at TCE and TCW, respectively to obtain 1-hour TSP samples.  The selected baseline monitoring stations should reflect baseline conditions at the impact stations.  One-hour sampling should also be done at least 3 times per day while the highest dust impact is expected.

During the baseline monitoring, there should not be any major construction or dust generation activities in the vicinity of the monitoring stations.  Before commencing baseline monitoring, the ET shall inform the IEC of the baseline monitoring programme such that, if required, the ER can conduct on-site audit to ensure accuracy of the baseline monitoring results.

In case the baseline monitoring cannot be carried out at the designated monitoring locations, the ET Leader shall carry out the monitoring at alternative locations that can effectively represent the baseline conditions at the impact monitoring locations.  The alternative baseline monitoring locations shall be approved by the ER and agreed with the IEC.

In exceptional cases, when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET shall liaise with the IEC and EPD to agree on an appropriate set of data to be used as a baseline reference and submit to ER for approval.

Ambient conditions may vary seasonally and shall be reviewed once every three months.  When the ambient conditions have changed and a repeat of the baseline monitoring is required to be carried out for obtaining the updated baseline levels, the monitoring should be at times when the Contractor's activities are not generating dust, at least in the proximity of the monitoring stations.  Should change in ambient conditions be determined, the baseline levels and, in turn, the air quality criteria, should be revised.  The revised baseline levels and air quality criteria should be agreed with the IEC and EPD.

5.8.1                                 Proposal of Alternative Monitoring Stations for Tung Chung East Baseline Monitoring

It should be noted that locations DM-2, DM-3 and DM-4 (Table 5.1) are located at the reclaimed land of TCE, which is currently not available for baseline monitoring.  As such, three alternative locations DM-2A, DM-3A and DM-4A are proposed, approved by the ER and agreed by the IEC to be conducted for the baseline monitoring (see Table 5.2 and Figure 5.2).  The alternative locations are proposed based on the criteria as stated in Section 5.7.  In summary, the baseline monitoring for TCE will be carried out at four monitoring locations (DM-1, DM-2A, DM-3A and DM-4A) prior to the commissioning of major construction works at TCE.

Table 5.2        Alternative Construction Dust Monitoring Locations

ID

Location

DM-2A

School in Tung Chung East

DM-3A

Residential premise near Tung Chung East

DM-4A

Pak Mong Pier

5.9                                        Impact Monitoring

The ET shall carry out impact monitoring during the entire construction period unless specified in Table 5.1.  For regular impact monitoring of 1-hour TSP, the sampling frequency of at least 3 times in every 6 days should be undertaken when the highest dust impact occurs.  Before commencing impact monitoring, the ET shall inform the IEC of the impact monitoring programme such that the IEC can conduct on-site audit to ensure accuracy of the monitoring results.

In case of non-compliance with the air quality criteria, more frequent monitoring, as specified in the Event and Action Plan in the following section, shall be conducted within the specified timeframe after the result is obtained.  This additional monitoring shall be continued until the excessive dust emission or the deterioration in air quality is rectified, and agreed with the ER and the IEC.

5.10                                     Action and Limit Levels

The baseline monitoring results form the basis for determining the air quality criteria for the impact monitoring.  The ET shall compare the impact monitoring results with air quality criteria set up for 1-hour TSP.  Table 5.3 shows the air quality criteria, namely Action and Limit Levels to be used.

Table 5.3        Action and Limit Levels for Air Quality

Parameters

Action

Limit

1-hour TSP Level in μg/m3

For baseline level £ 384 μg/m3,

Action level = (baseline level * 1.3 + Limit level)/2;

For baseline level > 384 μg/m3,

Action level = Limit level

500 μg/m3

 

5.11                                     Event and Action Plan

Should non-compliance of the air quality criteria occur, actions in accordance with the Action Plan in Table 5.4 shall be carried out.


Table 5.4        Event and Action Plan for Air Quality

Event

Action

ET

IEC

ER

Contractor

Action level exceedance for one sample

1. Identify source, investigate the causes of exceedance and propose remedial measures;

2. Inform IEC and ER;

3. Repeat measurement to confirm finding;

4. Increase monitoring frequency to daily.

 

1. Check monitoring data submitted by ET;

2. Check Contractor’s working method.

1. Notify Contractor.

1. Rectify any unacceptable practice;

2. Amend working methods if appropriate.

Action level exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

1. Identify source;

2. Inform IEC and ER;

3. Advise the ER on the effectiveness of the proposed remedial measures;

4. Repeat measurements to confirm findings;

5. Increase monitoring frequency to daily;

6. Discuss with IEC and Contractor on remedial actions required;

7. If exceedance continues, arrange meeting with IEC and ER;

8. If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

1. Check monitoring data submitted by ET;

2. Check Contractor’s working method;

3. Discuss with ET and Contractor on possible remedial measures;

4. Advise the ET on the effectiveness of the proposed remedial measures;

5. Supervise Implementation of remedial measures.

1. Confirm receipt of notification of failure in writing;

2. Notify Contractor;

3. Ensure remedial measures properly implemented.

 

1. Submit proposals for remedial to ER within 3 working days of notification;

2. Implement the agreed proposals;

3. Amend proposal if appropriate.

Limit level exceedance for one sample

1. Identify source, investigate the causes of exceedance and propose remedial measures;

2. Inform ER, Contractor and EPD;

3. Repeat measurement to confirm finding;

4. Increase monitoring frequency to daily;

5. Assess effectiveness of Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IEC, EPD and ER informed of the results.

1. Check monitoring data submitted by ET;

2. Check Contractor’s working method;

3. Discuss with ET and Contractor on possible remedial measures;

4. Advise the ER on the effectiveness of the proposed remedial measures;

5. Supervise implementation of remedial measures.

 

1. Confirm receipt of notification of failure in writing;

2. Notify Contractor;

3. Ensure remedial measures properly implemented.

1. Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance;

2. Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC within 3 working days of notification;

3. Implement the agreed proposals;

4. Amend proposal if appropriate.

Limit level exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

1. Notify IEC, ER, Contractor and EPD;

2. Identify source;

3. Repeat measurement to confirm findings;

4. Increase monitoring frequency to daily;

5. Carry out analysis of Contractor’s working procedures to determine possible mitigation to be implemented;

6. Arrange meeting with IEC and ER to discuss the remedial actions to be taken;

7. Assess effectiveness of Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IEC, EPD and ER informed of the results;

8. If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

1. Discuss amongst ER, ET, and Contractor on the potential remedial actions;

2. Review Contractor’s remedial actions whenever necessary to assure their effectiveness and advise the ER accordingly;

3. Supervise the implementation of remedial measures.

1. Confirm receipt of notification of failure in writing;

2. Notify Contractor;

3. In consultation with the IEC, agree with the Contractor on the remedial measures to be implemented;

4. Ensure remedial measures properly implemented;

5. If exceedance continues, consider what portion of the work is responsible and instruct the Contractor to stop that portion of work until the exceedance is abated.

1. Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance;

2. Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC within 3 working days of notification;

3. Implement the agreed proposals;

4. Resubmit proposals if problem still not under control;

5. Stop the relevant portion of works as determined by the ER until the exceedance is abated.

 

 

 


6                                              Noise Impact

6.1                                        Introduction

The EIA has considered the potential noise impacts during both the construction and operational phases of the Project.  Noise monitoring is proposed to be conducted during construction and operational phase.

6.2                                        Mitigation Measures

6.2.1                                 Construction Phase

The EIA Report has recommended construction noise mitigation measures including the use of quiet plant and temporary noise barriers, etc.  All the proposed mitigation measures are summarized in the EMIS in Appendix 4.1.

6.2.2                                 Operational Phase

Road Traffic Noise

Due to the nature of the Project, population intake will be carried out in 4 phases (i.e. Year 2023 for Phase 1, Year 2025 for Phase 2, Year 2027 for Phase 3 and Year 2030 for Phase 4) and thus road traffic noise impact assessments at interim years and ultimate year have been conducted. Results indicate that mitigation measures at interim years Year 2025 and Year 2027, and ultimate Year 2045 will be required.  A series of noise mitigation measures including 1) noise barriers along some road sections or boundary walls within development sites; 2) application of low noise road surfacing materials on some road sections; 3) suitable treatment on end walls, arranging noise tolerant portions of buildings in internal layout design and architectural fins in some buildings, would need to be implemented and the required mitigation measures under the above mentioned years are listed in Table 6.1a to Table 6.1d and are shown in Figure 6.1, Figure 6.1a-b, Figure 6.2, Figures 6.2a-b, Figure 6.3, Figures 6.3a-d, Figure 6.4, and Figures 6.4a-e respectively. 

Table 6.1a      Extents and Locations of Proposed Mitigation Measures at 2023

Zoning

Location

Type of Mitigation Measures [1] [2] [3]

TCE

B1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

B1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-2

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

TCW

TCV-6

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

-

Possible School Development near Tung Chung Area 39

Approx. 50m long, 4m high school boundary wall

-

Corner at junction between Chung Mun Road and Road L24

Approx. 120m long, 5m high vertical barrier with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

-

Along Chung Mun Road

Approx. 210m long LNRS

-

Along Road L24

Approx. 160m long LNRS

-

Along Road L30

Approx. 160m long LNRS

Notes:

[1] Details are shown in Figure 6.1.

[2] LNRS – Low Noise Road Surfacing Materials.

[3] An environmental review may be conducted in due course to study how the use of new road surfacing material could help reduce traffic noise impacts and minimise the scale/extent of the proposed noise mitigation measures.

 

Table 6.1b      Extents and Locations of Proposed Mitigation Measures at 2025

Zoning

Location

Type of Mitigation Measures [1] [2] [3]

TCE

B1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

B1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-2

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

D0-3

Along Road L3

Approx. 60m long, 5m high school boundary wall

D0-4

Along Road L3

Approx. 70m long, 5m high school boundary wall with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

D1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-3

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-4

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-4

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

TCW

TCV-6

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

-

Possible School Development near Tung Chung Area 39

Approx. 50m long, 4m high school boundary wall

-

Corner at junction between Chung Mun Road and Road L24

Approx. 120m long, 5m high vertical barrier with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

-

Along Chung Mun Road

Approx. 210m long LNRS

-

Along Road L24

Approx. 160m long LNRS

-

Along Road L30

Approx. 160m long LNRS

Notes:

[1] Details are shown in Figure 6.2.

[2] LNRS – Low Noise Road Surface Materials.

[3] An environmental review may be conducted in due course to study how the use of new road surfacing material could help reduce traffic noise impacts and minimise the scale/extent of the proposed noise mitigation measures.

Table 6.1c      Extents and Locations of Proposed Mitigation Measures at 2027

Zoning

Location

Type of Mitigation Measures [1] [2] [3]

TCE

A1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A1-1

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A1-2

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A2-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

A2-1

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A2-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-3

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-4

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-4

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

A2-4

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

B1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

B1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-2

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

D0-3

Along Road L3

Approx. 60m long, 5m high school boundary wall

D0-4

Along Road L3

Approx. 70m long, 5m high school boundary wall with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

D1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-3

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-4

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-4

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

TCW

TCV-6

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

-

Possible School Development near Tung Chung Area 39

Approx. 50m long, 4m high school boundary wall

-

Corner at junction between Chung Mun Road and Road L24

Approx. 120m long, 5m high vertical barrier with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

-

Along Chung Mun Road

Approx. 210m long LNRS

-

Along Road L24

Approx. 160m long LNRS

-

Along Road L30

Approx. 160m long LNRS

Notes:

[1] Details are shown in Figure 6.3.

[2] LNRS – Low Noise Road Surface Materials.

[3] An environmental review may be conducted in due course to study how the use of new road surfacing material could help reduce traffic noise impacts and minimise the scale/extent of the proposed noise mitigation measures.

Table 6.1d   Extents and Locations of Proposed Mitigation Measures at 2045

Zoning

Location

Type of Mitigation Measures [1] [2] [3]

TCE

A1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A1-1

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A1-2

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A2-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

A2-1

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A2-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-3

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-4

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

A2-4

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

A2-4

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

A2-4

Along Road D3

Approx. 100m long, 5m high absorptive vertical barrier

B1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

B1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

B1-2

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

C1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

C1-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

C1-1

Facade of residential block

1.8m long architectural fin

C1-1

Along Road L7

Approx. 50m long, 5m high absorptive vertical barrier with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

C2-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

C2-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D0-3

Along Road L3

Approx. 60m long, 5m high school boundary wall

D0-4

Along Road L3

Approx. 70m long, 5m high school boundary wall with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

D1-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D1-2

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-3

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-4

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

D2-4

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

E0-1

Along Road L2

Approx. 80m long, 4m high school boundary wall

E0-3

Along Road L2

Approx. 40m long, 3m high school boundary wall

E1-4

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

E1-5

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

TCW

TCV-1

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

TCV-1

Facade of residential block

1.5m long architectural fin

TCV-6

Facade of residential block

Facade with no openable window

-

Possible School Development near Tung Chung Area 39

Approx. 50m long, 4m high school boundary wall

-

Corner at junction between Chung Mun Road and Road L24

Approx. 120m long, 5m high vertical barrier with 3m cantilevered arm at 45o

-

Along Chung Mun Road

Approx. 210m long LNRS

-

Along Road L24

Approx. 160m long LNRS

-

Along Road L30

Approx. 160m long LNRS

Notes:

[1] Details are shown in Figure 6.4.

[2] LNRS – Low Noise Road Surface Materials.

[3] An environmental review may be conducted in due course to study how the use of new road surfacing material could help reduce traffic noise impacts and minimise the scale/extent of the proposed noise mitigation measures.

Apart from the proposed noise mitigation measures, it should be noted the design and layout of the new town extension have also proactively located some commercial buildings between residential buildings and NLH to provide noise screening.  This helps to avoid traffic noise impacts from NLH as much as practicable at the outlet.

Fixed Noise

For the proposed noise sources which are located near to existing and planned NSRs, the following tentative noise mitigation measures shall be considered:

·             All the pumps should be enclosed inside building structures;

·             Proper selection of quiet plant to reduce the tonality at NSRs;

·             Installation of silencer / acoustic enclosure / acoustic louvers for the exhaust of ventilation system.

·             For underground train stations, sound attenuators with sufficient attenuations can be installed to the ventilation shafts.

·             Openings of ventilation system should be located away from NSRs.

6.3                                          Noise Monitoring Parameters

6.3.1                                 Noise Monitoring Parameter for Construction Phase

Construction noise level shall be measured in terms of the A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure level (Leq). Leq (30min) shall be used as the monitoring parameter for the time period between 0700 and 1900 hours on normal weekdays.  For all other time periods, Leq (5min) shall be employed for comparison with the Noise Control Ordinance (NCO) criteria.  A sample data sheet is shown in Appendix 6.1.

As supplementary information for data auditing, statistical results such as L10 and L90 shall also be obtained for reference.

6.3.2                                 Noise Monitoring Parameter for Operational Phase

The traffic noise level shall be measured twice within the first year of the road opening.  Measurement shall be made in terms of A-weighted L10 over three half-hour periods during the peak traffic hour.  Other metrics like Leq may be added as seen fit.

As supplementary information for data auditing, statistical results such as L10 and L90 shall also be obtained for reference.

6.4                                          Monitoring Equipment

6.4.1                                 Monitoring Equipment for Construction and Operational Phase

As referred to in the Technical Memorandum (TM) issued under the NCO, sound level meters in compliance with the International Electrotechnical Commission Publications 651: 1979 (Type 1) and 804: 1985 (Type 1) specifications shall be used for carrying out the noise monitoring. Immediately prior to and following each noise measurement, the accuracy of the sound level meter shall be checked using an acoustic calibrator generating a known sound pressure level at a known frequency.  Measurements may be accepted as valid only if the calibration level from before and after the noise measurement agrees to within 1.0 dB.

Noise measurements should be made in accordance with standard acoustical principles and practices in relation to weather conditions.

The ET is responsible for the provision, installation, operation, maintenance, dismantle of the monitoring equipment.  He shall ensure that sufficient noise measuring equipment and associated instrumentation are available for carrying out the baseline monitoring, regular impact monitoring and ad hoc monitoring.  All the equipment and associated instrumentation shall be clearly labelled.

6.5                                          Monitoring Locations

6.5.1                                 Monitoring Locations for Construction Phase

The most representative and affected NSRs were selected as monitoring stations and details could be referred to EIA Report.  The locations of construction airborne noise monitoring stations are summarised in Table 6.2 below and shown in Figures 6.5, 6.5a – 6.5d.

Table 6.2        Proposed Construction Noise Monitoring Locations

ID

NSR ID

Description

Tung Chung East

NMS-CA-1

B1-2-04

Residential premise in Tung Chung East

NMS-CA-2

F0-3-01

School in Tung Chung East

NMS-CA-3

PSc-001

School in the reclamation area next to Tung Chung East

NMS-CA-4

A56-004

Residential premise in the reclamation area next to Tung Chung East

Tung Chung West

NMS-CA-5

MWC-003

Village house in Ma Wan Chung

NMS-CA-6

SMK-003

Village house in Shek Mun Kap

NMS-CA-7

Esc-006

YMCA of Hong Kong Christian College

NMS-CA-8

Esc-003

Caritas Charles Vath College

NMS-CA-9

PSc-004

Possible school development near Tung Chung Area 39

 

The ET shall select the monitoring locations from the above table based on the locations of the construction activities and seek approval from ER and agreement from the IEC and EPD to the proposal.  The monitoring locations should be chosen based on the following criteria:

·             At locations close to the major site activities which are likely to have noise impacts;

·             Close to the most affected existing noise sensitive receivers; and

·             For monitoring locations located in the vicinity of the sensitive receivers, care should be taken to cause minimal disturbance to the occupants during monitoring.

The monitoring station shall normally be at a point 1 m from the exterior of the sensitive receiver building facade and be at a position 1.2 m above the ground.  If there is problem with access to the normal monitoring position, an alternative position may be chosen, and a correction to the measurements shall be made.  For reference, a correction of +3 dB(A) shall be made to the free field measurements.  The ET shall agree with the IEC on the monitoring position and the corrections adopted.  Once the positions for the monitoring stations are chosen, the baseline monitoring and the impact monitoring shall be carried out at the same positions.

The ET may, depending on site conditions and monitoring results, decide whether additional monitoring locations shall be included or any monitoring locations could be removed / relocated during any stage of the construction phase.

6.5.2                                 Monitoring Locations for Operational Phase

The locations of road traffic noise monitoring stations after final population intake are summarised in Table 6.3 below and shown in Figures 6.6 and 6.6a.

Table 6.3        Proposed Road Traffic Noise Monitoring Locations

ID

NSR ID

Description

Tung Chung East

NMS-OA-1

A1-1-04a

Residential premise in Tung Chung East

NMS-OA-2

A1-2-04l

Residential premise in Tung Chung East

NMS-OA-3

D0-4-02

School in Tung Chung East

Tung Chung West

NMS-OA-5

TCV-1-11a

Residential premise in Tung Chung West

NMS-OA-6

TCV-6-03

Residential premise in Tung Chung West

NMS-OA-7

ESc-003

Caritas Charles Vath College

 

The ET shall select the monitoring location and seek approval from ER and agreement from the IEC and EPD to the proposal.  The ER/IEC/EPD may also request a closer locations based on on-site conditions and environmental complaint.  The monitoring locations should be chosen based on the following criteria:

·             At locations close to the noise mitigation measures such as noise barriers;

·             Close to the most affected existing noise sensitive receivers; and

·             For monitoring locations located in the vicinity of the sensitive receivers, care should be taken to cause minimal disturbance to the occupants during monitoring.

The monitoring station shall normally be at a point 1 m from the exterior of the sensitive receiver building facade and be at a position 1.2 m above the ground.  If there is problem with access to the normal monitoring position, an alternative position may be chosen, and a correction to the measurements shall be made.  For reference, a correction of +3 dB(A) shall be made to the free field measurements.  The ET shall agree with the IEC on the monitoring position and the corrections adopted.

6.6                                          Baseline Monitoring

The ET shall carry out baseline noise monitoring prior to the commencement of the construction works at TCE and TCW, respectively, at the monitoring locations proposed in Section 6.5.  There shall not be any construction activities in the vicinity of the stations during the baseline monitoring.  Continuous baseline noise monitoring for the A-weighted levels Leq, L10 and L90 shall be carried out daily for a period of at least two weeks in a sample period interval of 5 minutes or 30 minutes between 0700 and 1900, and 5 minutes between 1900 and 0700.  A schedule on the baseline monitoring shall be submitted to the ER and IEC for approval before the monitoring starts.

In exceptional cases, when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET shall liaise with the IEC and EPD to agree on an appropriate set of data to be used as a baseline reference and submit to the ER for approval.

6.6.1                                 Proposal of Alternative Monitoring Stations for Tung Chung East Baseline Monitoring

It should be noted that locations NMS-CA-1 and NMS-CA-2 (Table 6.2) are located at the reclaimed land of TCE, which is currently not available for baseline monitoring.  As such, two alternative locations NMS-CA-1A and NMS-CA-2A are proposed, approved by the ER and agreed by the IEC to be conducted for the baseline monitoring (see Table 6.4 and Figure 6.7).  The alternative locations are proposed based on the criteria as stated in Section 6.5.1.  In summary, the baseline monitoring for TCE will be carried out at four monitoring locations (NMS-CA-1A, NMS-CA-2A, NMS-CA-3 and NMS-CA-4) prior to the commencement of the construction works at TCE.

Table 6.4        Alternative Construction Noise Monitoring Locations

ID

Location

NMS-CA-1A

Residential premise near Tung Chung East

NMS-CA-2A

Pak Mong Pier

6.7                                          Impact Monitoring

6.7.1                                 Impact Monitoring for Construction Phase

During normal construction working hour (0700-1900 Monday to Saturday), monitoring of Leq, (30min) noise levels (as six consecutive Leq, (5min) readings) shall be carried out at the agreed monitoring locations once every week in accordance with the methodology in the TM.  Noise measurement shall not be made in the presence of fog, rain, wind with a steady speed exceeding 5m/s or wind with gusts exceeding 10m/s.

In case of non-compliance with the construction noise criteria, more frequent monitoring, as specified in the Action Plan, shall be carried out.  This additional monitoring shall be continued until the recorded noise levels are rectified or proved to be irrelevant to the construction activities.

A schedule on the compliance monitoring shall be submitted to the ER and IEC for approval before the monitoring starts.

6.7.2                                 Impact Monitoring for Road Traffic Noise during Operational Phase

The ET should prepare and deposit to EPD, at least 6 months before the operation of the proposed roads under the Project, a monitoring plan for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of traffic noise predictions by comparing the noise impact predictions with the actual impacts.  The monitoring plan should contain monitoring locations, monitoring schedules, methodology of noise monitoring including noise measurement procedures, traffic counts and speed checks, and methodology of comparison with the predicted levels.  The ET should implement the monitoring plan in accordance with the deposited monitoring plan unless with prior justifications.  Monitoring details and results including the comparison between the measured noise levels and the predicted levels should be recorded in a report to be deposited with EPD within one month of the completion of the monitoring.  The report should be certified by the ET Leader before deposit with EPD.

Traffic noise monitoring shall be carried out at all the designated traffic noise monitoring stations.  The following is an initial guide on the traffic noise monitoring requirements during the operational phase:

·             two sets of measurements at the morning traffic peak hour on normal days;

·             one set of measurement at the morning traffic peak hour on festival days;

·             a concurrent census of traffic flow and percentage heavy vehicles shall be conducted for the Project Road and the existing road network in the vicinity of each measurement points;

·             average vehicle speed estimated for Project Road and the existing road network in the vicinity of each measuring points; and

·             the three sets of monitoring data shall be obtained within the first year of operation.

Measured noise levels shall be compared with the predicted noise levels by applying appropriate conversion corrections to allow for the traffic conditions at the time of measurement.

6.7.3                                 Fixed Noise Commissioning Test

The maximum allowable sound power levels of the identified fixed noise sources have been predicted in the EIA report.  The Contractor should implement and refine the specified sound power levels as appropriate to ensure compliances with the noise standards stipulated in the TM-EIAO and NCO for the fixed plant operations.

The Contractor should also carry out a noise commissioning test for all fixed noise sources before operation of the Project, in order to ensure compliance of the noise levels with the TM’s stipulated noise standard.

6.8                                        Action and Limit Levels

The ET shall compare the construction noise monitoring results with noise criteria.  Table 6.5 shows the noise criteria, namely Action and Limit Levels to be used.

Table 6.5        Action and Limit Levels for Construction Noise

Time Period

Action Level

Limit Level

0700 - 1900 hours on normal weekdays

When one documented complaint is received

75 dB(A) *

Notes:      

If works are to be carried out during restricted hours, the conditions stipulated in the construction noise permit issued by the Noise Control Authority have to be followed.

*  Reduce to 70 dB(A) for schools and 65 dB(A) during school examination periods.

6.9                                        Event and Action Plan

Should non-compliance of the noise criteria occur, actions in accordance with the Action Plan in Table 6.6 shall be carried out.

For traffic noise, the measured / monitored noise levels shall be compared with the predicted results and the predicted traffic flow conditions (calculated noise levels based on concurrent traffic census obtained). In case discrepancies are observed, explanation shall be given to justify the discrepancies.


Table 6.6        Event and Action Plan for Construction Noise

Event

Action

ET

IEC

ER

Contractor

Action Level Exceedance

1. Notify IEC, ER and Contractor;

2. Carry out investigation;

3. Report the results of investigation to the IEC, ER and Contractor;

4. Discuss with the Contractor and formulate remedial measures;

5. Increase monitoring frequency to check mitigation effectiveness.

1. Review the analysed results submitted by the ET;

2. Review the proposed remedial measures by the Contractor and advise the ER accordingly;

3. Supervise the implementation of remedial measures.

1. Confirm receipt of notification of failure in writing;

2. Notify Contractor;

3. Require Contractor to propose remedial measures for the analysed noise problem;

4. Ensure remedial measures are properly implemented

1. Submit noise mitigation proposals to IEC and ER;

2. Implement noise mitigation proposals.

Limit Level Exceedance

1. Identify source;

2. Inform IEC, ER, EPD and Contractor;

3. Repeat measure-ments to confirm findings;

4. Increase monitoring frequency;

5. Carry out analysis of Contractor’s working procedures to determine possible mitigation to be implemented;

6. Inform IEC, ER and EPD the causes and actions taken for the exceedances;

7. Assess effectiveness of Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IEC, EPD and ER informed of the results;

8. If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

1. Discuss amongst ER, ET, and Contractor on the potential remedial actions;

2. Review Contractors remedial actions whenever necessary to assure their effectiveness and advise the ER accordingly;

3. Supervise the implementation of remedial measures.

1. Confirm receipt of notification of failure in writing;

2. Notify Contractor;

3. Require Contractor to propose remedial measures for the analysed noise problem;

4. Ensure remedial measures properly implemented;

5. If exceedance continues, consider what portion of the work is responsible and instruct the Contractor to stop that portion of work until the exceedance is abated.

1. Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance;

2. Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC  within 3 working days of notification;

3. Implement the agreed proposals;

4. Resubmit proposals if problem still not under control;

5. Stop the relevant portion of works as determined by the ER until the exceedance is abated.

 

 


7                                              Water Quality Impact

7.1                                        Introduction

The EIA Report has assessed the water quality impacts associated with the Project. According to the EIA Report, the water quality impact could be minimized with the implementation of mitigation measures.  The water quality monitoring programme as discussed below could ensure the implementation of the recommended mitigation measures and provide continue improvements to the environmental conditions.

7.2                                        Mitigation Measures

The EIA Report has recommended construction phase mitigation measures. All the proposed mitigation measures are summarized in the EMIS in Appendix 4.1.

7.3                                        Water Monitoring Parameters

The monitoring shall normally be established by measuring the dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved oxygen saturation (DO%), temperature, turbidity, salinity, pH and suspended solids (SS) in water bodies at all designated locations as specified in Section 7.6.

The measurements shall be taken at all designated monitoring stations 3 days per week during construction phase.  The interval between two sampling surveys shall not be less than 36 hours.

Two (2) replicate in-situ measurements and samples collected from each independent sampling event shall be collected to ensure a robust statistically interpretable database.  DO, pH value, salinity, temperature and turbidity should be measured in-situ whereas other parameters should be determined by an accredited laboratory.

Other relevant data shall also be recorded, including monitoring location / position, time, water depth, tidal stages, weather conditions and any special phenomena or work underway at the construction site.

7.4                                        Monitoring Equipment

7.4.1                                 Dissolved Oxygen, Dissolved Oxygen Saturation and Temperature Measuring Equipment

The dissolved oxygen (DO) measuring instruments should be portable and weatherproof. The equipment should also complete with cable and sensor, and DC power source. It should be capable of measuring:

·             A DO level in the range of 0 – 20 mg/L and 0 – 200% saturation; and

·             A temperature of 0 – 45 degree Celsius.

The equipment should have a membrane electrode with automatic temperature compensation complete with a cable.

Should salinity compensation not be built-in to the DO equipment, in-situ salinity should be measured to calibrate the DO measuring instruments prior to each measurement.

7.4.2                                 Turbidity Measuring Equipment

The turbidity measuring instruments should be a portable and weatherproof with DC power source.  It should have a photoelectric sensor capable of measuring turbidity level between 0 – 1000 NTU (for example, Hach model 2100P or an approved similar instrument).

7.4.3                                 Salinity Measuring Equipment

A portable salinometer capable of measuring salinity in the range of 0 – 40 parts per thousand (ppt) should be provided for measuring salinity of the water at each monitoring location.

7.4.4                                 pH Measuring Equipment

A portable pH meter capable of measuring a pH range between 0.0 and 14.0 shall be provided under the specified conditions (e.g., Orion Model 250A or an approved similar instrument).

7.4.5                                 Positioning Equipment

A hand-held or boat-fixed type digital Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) with way point bearing indication and Radio Technical Commission for maritime (RTCM) Type 16 error message “screen pop-up” facilities (for real-time auto-display of error messages and DGPS corrections from the Hong Kong Hydrographic Office), or other equipment instrument of similar accuracy, should be provided and used during marine water monitoring to ensure the monitoring vessel is at the correct location before taking measurements.

7.4.6                                 Water Depth Detector

A portable, battery-operated echo sounder should be used for water depths determination at each designated monitoring station.  The detector can either be hand held or affixed to the bottom of the work boat, if the same vessel is to be used throughout the monitoring programme.

7.4.7                                 Water Sampling Equipment

A water sampler is required for SS monitoring.  It should comprise a transparent PVC cylinder, with a capacity of not less than 2 litres, which can be effectively sealed with latex cups at both ends.  The sampler should have a positive latching system to keep it open and prevent premature closure until released by a messenger when the sampler is at the selected water depth (for example, Kahlsico Water Sampler or an approved similar instrument).

7.4.8                                 Sample Containers and Storage

Water samples for SS should be stored in high density polythene bottles with no preservative added, packed in ice (cooled to 4°C without being frozen) and shipment to the testing laboratory.  The samples shall be delivered to the laboratory within 24 hours of collection and be analysed as soon as possible after collection.

7.4.9                                 Calibration of In-Situ Instruments

The pH meter, DO meter and turbidimeter shall be checked and calibrated before use.  DO meter and turbidimeter shall be certified by a laboratory accredited under HOKLAS or any other international accreditation scheme, and subsequently re-calibrated at quarterly basis throughout all stages of the water quality monitoring.  Responses of sensors and electrodes should be checked with certified standard solutions before each use.  Wet bulb calibration for a DO meter shall be carried out before measurement at each monitoring station.

7.4.10                               Back-up Equipment and Vessels

Sufficient stocks of spare parts shall be maintained for replacements when necessary.  Backup monitoring equipment shall also be made available so that monitoring can proceed uninterrupted even when some equipment is under maintenance, calibration, malfunction, etc.

The water quality monitoring will involve four monitoring stations and measurements should be conducted within the prescribed tidal conditions in order to ensure the measurement / samples are representative.  A multi-probe monitoring equipment set integrated with water sampler(s) is highly recommended to improve the monitoring efficiency.  Depending on the actual operation, more than one field survey vessels might be required simultaneously to ensure the monitoring are conducted within the acceptable monitoring period.  The ET shall also consider the use of unattended automatic sampling / monitoring devices at fixed stations where monitoring are required throughout the construction period. The use of such unattended automatic devices, however, shall be subject to the approval of the ER, IEC and EPD.

7.5                                        Laboratory Measurement / Analysis

At least 2 replicate samples from each independent sampling event are required for the SS measurement which shall be carried in a HOKLAS or international accredited laboratory.  Sufficient water samples shall be collected at the monitoring stations for carrying out the laboratory measurement and analysis.  The laboratory determination work shall start within 24 hours after collection of the water samples.  The analysis for suspended solids is presented in Table 7.1.

Table 7.1        Laboratory Analysis

Parameters

Analytical Method

Reporting Limit

Suspended Solid (SS)

APHA 2540-D

0.5 mg/L

 

7.6                                        Monitoring Locations

Water quality monitoring will be carried out at 7 locations at TCE (TCE-WQM1 to TCE-WQM4, TCE-C1 to TCE-C2) and 5 locations of TCW (TCW-WQM1 to TCE-WQM5) of the inland water of the marine water nearby the project site. 

The proposed water quality monitoring locations are shown in Figure 7.1 and Figure 7.1a and listed in Table 7.2.  The ET shall seek approval from IEC and EPD for any alternative monitoring locations.

Table 7.2        Locations of Proposed Water Quality Monitoring Stations

Monitoring Station ID

Description

Easting

Northing

Tung Chung East

TCE-WQM1

Near Airport Channel

811838

817341

TCE-WQM2a

Marine Park 1

814439

819879

TCE-WQM2b

Marine Park 2

821905

821905

TCE-WQM3

Tai Ho Wan

814845

817676

TCE-WQM4

HKBCF

813344

818849

TCE-C1

Control Station - Outside Airport Channel

804247

815620

TCE-C2

Control Station - Sunny Bay

819460

821473

Tung Chung West

TCW-WQM1

Downstream of Tung Chung Stream

810784

815710

TCW-WQM2

Middle of Tung Chung Stream

810701

815015

TCW-WQM3

Middle of Tung Chung Stream

811067

815036

TCW-WQM4

Upstream of Tung Chung Stream

810641

814405

TCW-WQM5

Upstream of Tung Chung Stream

811194

814368

 

7.6.1                                 Proposal of Alternative Monitoring Location for Tung Chung East

It is proposed and the IEC agreed to relocate monitoring station TCE-WQM3 to TCE-WQM3A (the outlet of Tai Ho Wan) (see Table 7.3 and Figure 7.2) owing to the following reasons:

·             Due to the presence of the North Lantau Highway and the vessel draft of the monitoring vessel, it is not practicable to enter station TCE-WQM3 during flood tide in consideration of the vessel operational safety.

·             The use of alternative transportation (e.g. speed boat) has been considered, however, it is considered not practicable for both baseline and impact monitoring considering the health and safety of the monitoring works as a smaller boat / speed boat will have limited space for both labour and equipment.  It will also have limited support during adverse weather (e.g. windy, rainy / stormy conditions).

·             The relocated station is located at the outlet of Tai Ho Wan, which is closer to the Project and thus it is considered more representative in determining whether there is any potential water quality impact to Tai Ho Wan.

Table 7.3        Locations of Proposed Alternative Water Quality Monitoring Station

Monitoring Station ID

Description

Easting

Northing

Tung Chung East

TCE-WQM3A

Outlet of Tai Ho Wan

814705

817859

Subject to the approval by the EPD on the proposed alternative water quality monitoring station, the water quality monitoring would be conducted at TCE-WQM3A instead of TCE-WQM3 during the baseline and impact monitoring.

7.7                                        Baseline Monitoring

Baseline conditions for water quality shall be established and agreed with EPD prior to be commencement of construction works at TCE and TCW, respectively.  The purpose of the baseline monitoring is to establish ambient conditions prior to the commencement of the construction works and to demonstrate the suitability of the proposed impact and control monitoring stations.

The baseline monitoring shall be conducted for at least 4 weeks prior to the commencement of construction works at TCE and TCW.  The proposed water quality monitoring schedule shall be submitted to EPD by the ET at least 2 weeks before the first day of the monitoring month.  The interval between two sets of monitoring shall not be less than 36 hours.  EPD shall also be notified immediately for any changes in schedule.

In general, where the difference in value between the first and second in-situ measurement of DO or turbidity parameters is more than 25% of the value of the first reading, the reading shall be discarded and further readings should be taken.

There should be no construction work in the vicinity of the stations during the baseline monitoring.  The baseline data will be used to establish the Action and Limit Levels. The determination of Action and Limit Levels will be discussed in Section 7.9.

Table 7.4 below summarizes the proposed monitoring frequency and water quality parameters for baseline monitoring.

Table 7.4        Proposed Water Quality Baseline Monitoring Programme

Item

Baseline Monitoring

Monitoring Period

At least 4 weeks prior to the commencement of construction work

Monitoring Frequency

3 Days in a Week at both mid-ebb and mid-flood tides

Monitoring Locations

TCE: TCE-WQM1, TCE-WQM2a, TCE-WQM2b, TCE-WQM3A, TCE-WQM4, TCE-C1 , TCE–C2

TCW: TCW-WQM1, TCW-WQM2, TCW-WQM3, TCW-WQM4, TCW-WQM5

Monitoring Parameters

Dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved oxygen saturation (DO%), temperature, turbidity, salinity, pH and suspended solids (SS).

Intervals between 2 sets of monitoring

Not less than 36 hours

 

7.8                                        Impact Monitoring

The impact monitoring shall be conducted during construction period at TCE and TCW, respectively.  The purpose of impact monitoring is to ensure the implementation of the recommended mitigation measures, provide effective control of any malpractices, and provide continuous improvements to the environmental conditions.  The proposed water quality monitoring schedule shall be submitted to EPD by the ET at least 2 weeks before the first day of the monitoring month.  The interval between two sets of monitoring shall not be less than 36 hours.  EPD shall also be notified immediately for any changes in schedule.

In general, where the difference in value between the first and second in-situ measurement of DO or turbidity parameters is more than 25% of the value of the first reading, the reading shall be discarded and further readings should be taken.

In case of project-related exceedances of Action and/or Limit Levels, the impact monitoring frequency shall be increased according to the requirement of Event and Action Plan.  The details of Event Action Plan will be discussed in Section 7.10.

Table 7.5 below summarises the proposed monitoring frequency and water quality parameters for and impact monitoring.

Table 7.5      Proposed Water Quality Impact Monitoring Programme

Item

Impact Monitoring

Monitoring Period

During entire construction period

Monitoring Frequency

3 Days in a Week at both mid-ebb and mid-flood tides

Monitoring Locations

TCE: TCE-WQM1, TCE-WQM2a, TCE-WQM2b, TCE-WQM3A, TCE-WQM4, TCE-C1 , TCE–C2

TCW: TCW-WQM1, TCW-WQM2, TCW-WQM3, TCW-WQM4, TCW-WQM5

Monitoring Parameters

Dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved oxygen saturation (DO%), temperature, turbidity, salinity, pH and suspended solids (SS).

Intervals between 2 sets of monitoring

Not less than 36 hours

 

7.9                                        Action and Limit Levels

The Action and Limit Levels for water quality are defined in Table 7.6 below.

Table 7.6        Action and Limit Levels for Water Quality

Parameters

Action Level

Limit Level

DO in mg/L

(Surface, Middle & Bottom)

Surface and Middle

5 percentile of baseline data. [1]

 

Bottom

5 percentile of baseline data

Surface and Middle

4 mg/L or 1 percentile of baseline data. [1]

 

Bottom

2 mg/L or 1 percentile of baseline data

 

SS in mg/L

95 percentile of baseline data or 120% of upstream control station at the same tide of the same day, whichever is higher. [2]

 

99 percentile of baseline data or 130% of upstream control station at the same tide of the same day, whichever is higher. [2]

Turbidity in NTU

95 percentile of baseline data or 120% of upstream control station at the same tide of the same day, whichever is higher. [2]

99 percentile of baseline data or 130% of upstream control station at the same tide of the same day, whichever is higher. [2]

Notes:

(1) For DO, non-compliance occurs when monitoring results is lower than the limits.

(2) For SS and turbidity, non-compliance occurs when monitoring results is larger than the limits

7.10                                     Event and Action Plan

Should non-compliance of the criteria occur, action in accordance with the Action Plan in the Table 7.7 below shall be carried out.


Table 7.7        Event and Action Plan for Water Quality

Event

Action

ET

IEC

ER

Contractor

Action level exceedance for one sampling day

1. Inform IEC, Contractor and ER;

2. Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods; and

3. Discuss remedial measures with IEC and Contractor and ER.

1. Discuss with ET, ER and Contractor on the implemented mitigation measures;

2. Review proposals on remedial measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3. Review and advise the ET and ER on the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

1. Discuss with IEC, ET and Contractor on the implemented mitigation measures;

2. Make agreement on the remedial measures to be implemented;

3. Supervise the implementation of agreed remedial measures.

1. Identify source(s) of impact;

2. Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

3. Rectify unacceptable practice;

4.Check all plant and equipment;

5. Consider changes of working methods;

6. Discuss with ER, ET and IEC and purpose remedial measures to IEC and ER; and

7. Implement the agreed mitigation measures.

Action level exceedance for more than one consecutive sampling days

1. Repeat in-situ measurement on next day of exceedance to confirm findings;

2. Inform IEC, contractor and ER;

3. Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

4. Discuss remedial measures with IEC, contractor and ER

5. Ensure remedial measures are implemented

1. Discuss with ET, Contractor and ER on the implemented mitigation measures;

2. Review the proposed remedial measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3. Review and advise the ET and ER on the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

1. Discuss with ET, IEC and Contractor on the proposed mitigation measures;

2. Make agreement on the remedial measures to be implemented ; and

3. Discuss with ET, IEC and Contractor on the effectiveness of the implemented remedial measures.

1. Identify source(s) of impact;

2. Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

3. Rectify unacceptable practice;

4. Check all plant and equipment and consider changes of working methods;

5. Discuss with ET, IEC and ER and submit proposal of remedial measures to ER and IEC within 3 working days of notification; and

6. Implement the agreed mitigation measures.

Limit level exceedance for one sampling day

1. Repeat measurement on next day of exceedance to confirm findings;

2. Inform IEC, contractor and ER;

3. Rectify unacceptable practice;

4. Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

5. Consider changes of working methods;

6. Discuss mitigation measures with IEC, ER and Contractor; and

7. Ensure the agreed remedial measures are implemented

1. Discuss with ET, Contractor and ER on the implemented mitigation measures;

2. Review the proposed remedial measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3. Review and advise the ET and ER on the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

1. Discuss with ET, IEC and Contractor on the implemented remedial measures;

2. Request Contractor to critically review the working methods;

3. Make agreement on the remedial measures to be implemented; and

4. Discuss with ET, IEC and Contractor on the effectiveness of the implemented remedial measures.

1. Identify source(s) of impact;

2. Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

3. Rectify unacceptable practice;

4. Check all plant and equipment and consider changes of working methods;

5. Discuss with ET, IEC and ER and submit proposal of additional mitigation measures to ER and IEC within 3 working days of notification; and

6. Implement the agreed remedial measures.

Limit level exceedance for more than one consecutive sampling days

1. Inform IEC, contractor and ER;

2. Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

3. Discuss mitigation measures with IEC, ER and Contractor; and

4. Ensure mitigation measures are implemented; and

5. Increase the monitoring frequency to daily until no exceedance of Limit Level for two consecutive days

1. Discuss with ET, Contractor and ER on the implemented mitigation measures;

2. Review the proposed remedial measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3. Review and advise the ET and ER on the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

1. Discuss with ET, IEC and Contractor on the implemented remedial measures;

2. Request Contractor to critically review the working methods;

3. Make agreement on the remedial measures to be implemented;

4. Discuss with ET and IEC on the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures; and

5. Consider and instruct, if necessary, the Contractor to slow down or to stop all or part of the dredging activities until no exceedance of Limit level. 

1. Identify source(s) of impact;

2. Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

3. Rectify unacceptable practice;

4. Check all plant and equipment and consider changes of working methods;

5. Discuss with ET, IEC and ER and submit proposal of additional mitigation measures to ER and IEC within 3 working days of notification; and

6. Implement the agreed remedial measures.

7. As directed by the ER, to slow down or stop all or part of the dredging activities until no exceedance of Limit level.

 

 


8                                              Sewage & Sewerage Treatment Implications

8.1                                        Introduction

An assessment of potential impacts due to the sewage arising from the proposed Project has been assessed in Section 6 of the EIA Report.

8.2                                        Mitigation Measures

8.2.1                                 Construction Phase

The sewage generated during the construction stage from the on-site workers will be collected in chemical toilets and disposed of off-site.  Therefore, no sewerage impacts are expected from the site during the construction phase.  As such, environmental monitoring and audit of the sewerage system is considered not required.

8.2.2                                 Operational Phase

Due to the key concerns of the ecological sensitivity of the Tung Chung Stream and Tung Chung Bay, the following provisions are proposed to enhance the sewerage network reliability and minimize environmental impacts due to system failure or in case of emergency situations.

Twin rising mains would be provided for proposed discharge from all proposed SPSs and the upgraded CMRSPS.  It is proposed to use both mains as duty from an economical and operational point of view.  Should one of the duty mains be taken out of operation, the remaining one would deliver more flow at a higher velocity (exceeding 3m/s) during a temporary period of repair.  Twin gravity sewers would also be provided at the downstream of the inlet break chamber for all proposed SPSs and the upgraded CMRSPS.

It is proposed to adopt high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe for proposed gravity sewers and rising mains.  As gravity sewers will not be pressurized, they carry no risk of bursting. Further protection on proposed rising mains with concrete surround will be provided to mitigate the risk of bursting.

With the above measures, bursting discharge from gravity sewers and rising mains is not anticipated as discussed and agreed with DSD and EPD.

Additional Provisions for Tung Chung West Development

Taking into account the ecological sensitivity of the Tung Chung Stream, the occurrence of a possible emergency event at the SPSs in TCW (including TCV West SPS, TCV North SPS and Upgraded CMRSPS) has been considered due to the following risks: pump failure; rising main failure; and power failure.

To mitigate the risks of pump, rising main and/or power failure, several mitigation measures are proposed to cater for the emergency situations including a) 100% standby pumping capacity within each SPS, with spare pump up to 50% pumping capacity stockpiled in each SPS for any emergency use; b) twin rising mains; c) dual-feed power supply; d) emergency storage facilities up to 6-hours ADWF capacity; and e) emergency communication mechanism amongst relevant government departments.

Considering the possible emergency situations and respective risks, as well as the practicality of construction, the above mitigation measures are considered the most appropriate and practical measures to deal with the emergency situations of the proposed SPSs in TCW development.  Therefore, based on these provisions emergency discharge is not expected, and thus no adverse impact on water quality or ecology due to emergency discharge from the proposed SPSs in TCW development is anticipated.

Additional Provisions for Tung Chung East Development

The occurrence of any single emergency event at TCE East SPS and TCE West SPS has been considered due to the following risks: pump failure; rising main failure; and power failure.

To mitigate the risks of pump, rising main and/or power failure, several mitigation measures are proposed to cater for the emergency situations including a) 100% standby pumping capacity within each SPS, with spare pump up to 50% pumping capacity stockpiled in each SPS for any emergency use; b) twin rising mains; c) dual-feed power supply; d) emergency storage facilities up to 6-hours ADWF capacity; and e) emergency communication mechanism amongst relevant government departments.

Considering the possible emergency situations and respective risks, as well as the practicality of construction, the above mitigation measures are considered the most appropriate and practical measures to deal with the emergency situations of the proposed SPSs in TCE development.  Therefore, based on these provisions emergency discharge from the proposed SPSs in TCE is not expected, and thus no adverse impact on water quality or ecology due to emergency discharge from the proposed SPSs in TCE development is anticipated.

In view of the above mitigation measures, environmental monitoring and audit of the sewage system is considered not required.  The implementation schedule of the relevant mitigation measures is presented in Appendix 4.1.

 

9                                              Waste Management Implications

9.1                                        Introduction

The quantity and timing for the generation of waste during the construction phase have been estimated.  Measures including the opportunity for on-site sorting, reusing excavated materials etc, are devised in the construction methodology to minimise the surplus materials to be disposed off-site.  Proper disposal of chemical waste should be via a licensed waste collector.

9.2                                        Mitigation Measures

All the proposed mitigation measures are stipulated in the EIA Report and summarised in the EMIS in Appendix 4.1.

EM&A requirements are required for waste management during the construction phase only and the effective management of waste arising during the construction phase will be monitored through the site audit programme. The aims of the waste audit are:

·     To ensure the waste arising from the works are handled, stored, collected, transferred and disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner; and

·     To encourage the reuse and recycling of material.

The types and quantities of waste that would be generated during the operational phase have been assessed.  It is anticipated there would not be any insurmountable impacts during the operational phase.  A trip-ticket system should be operated to monitor all movements of chemical wastes which will be collected by a licensed collector to a licensed facility for final treatment and disposal.  Recommendations have been made to ensure proper treatment and proper disposal of these wastes in the EIA Report and summarised in the EMIS in Appendix 4.1[CL1] .

According to Section 7.3 in the EIA report a Construction & Demolition Material Management Plan (C&DMMP) shall be submitted to the Public Fill Committee (PFC) for approval in the case of C&D materials disposal exceeding 50,000m3.  The C&DMMP was submitted to the PFC in June 2015 after being approved by the CEDD Vetting Committee.  The C&DMMP was approved by PFC on 18 September 2015.

According to Section 7.4 in the EIA report, the Contractor should prepare a Waste Management Plan (WMP) as part of the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) in accordance with the ETWB TC(W) No. 19/2005 for construction phase.  The EMP should be submitted to the Engineer for approval. Mitigation measures proposed in the EIA Report and summarised in the EMIS should be adopted.

9.3                                        Waste EM&A Requirements

The Contractor shall be required to pay attention to the environmental standard and guidelines and carry out appropriate waste management and obtain the relevant licence / permits for waste disposal.  The ET shall ensure that the Contractor has obtained from the appropriate authorities the necessary waste disposal permits or licences including:

·             Chemical Waste Permits / licenses under the Waste Disposal Ordinance (Cap 354);

·             Public Dumping Licence under the Land (Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance (Cap 28);

·             Marine Dumping Permit under the Dumping at Sea Ordinance (Cap 466);

·             Effluent Discharge Licence under the Water Pollution Control Ordinance; and

·             Approval of Construction & Demolition Material Management Plan (C&DMMP).

The Contractor shall refer to the relevant booklets issued by the DEP when applying for the licence/permit and the ET shall refer to these booklets for auditing purposes.

9.4                                        Site Audit Requirements

Regular audits and site inspections should be carried out during construction phase by the ET to ensure that the recommended good site practices and other recommended mitigation measures are properly implemented by the Contractor.  The audits should concern all aspects of on-site waste management practices including waste generation, storage, recycling, transport and disposal.  Apart from site inspection, documents including licences, permits, disposal and recycling records should be reviewed and audited for compliance with the legislation and contract requirements.

The requirements of the environmental audit programme are set out in Section 15 of this Manual. The audit programme will verify the implementation status and evaluate the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

 

10                                           Land Contamination Impact

10.1                                     Introduction

The EIA Report has assessed the land contamination associated with the Project.

10.2                                     Proposed Site Investigation for Potentially Contaminated Areas

As outlined in Sections 8.3 and 8.4 of the EIA report, 4 surveyed sites, i.e. TC-1, TC-4. TC-9 and TC-10 were identified to have potentially contaminated land use and environmental site investigation (SI) was proposed. Within these areas, a total of 18 locations are proposed for soil and groundwater sampling and testing according to the EPD’s Practice Guide for Investigation and Remediation of Contaminated Land.

As the 4 potentially contaminated sites are located in private land lot, SI is unlikely to be carried out at this stage. In addition, as the sites are still in operation, it is considered not worthy to carry out the SI at this stage as on-going activities would make the assessment result obsolete. It is recommended that further site visit be carried out by the PP’s appointed consultant once the future development of this site is confirmed and site access is available (e.g. after land resumption), in order to identify the need for SI for any additional hot spots as a result of the on-going activities. The PP’s appointed consultant would prepare and submit a supplementary Contamination Assessment Plan (CAP) to present findings of the further site visit for EPD review and approval prior to the commencement of the SI works.

10.3                                     Submission Requirements of CAR, RAP and RR

Following the completion of environmental SI and lab testing works, the Project Proponent would prepare the Contamination Assessment Report (CAR). The CAR would present the findings of the SI and evaluate the level and extent of potential contamination.

If land contamination is identified during the proposed environmental SI and remediation is required, a Remediation Action Plan (RAP) would be prepared.

A Remediation Report (RR) would also be prepared to demonstrate that the clean-up works are adequate. No construction / development works would be carried out within the potentially contaminated areas in the Study Area prior to the agreement of the RR.

The implementation schedule are summarised in the EMIS in Appendix 4.1.

 

11                                           Ecology

11.1                                     Introduction

The EIA has evaluated the ecological consequences of the Project and recommended ecological mitigation measures to avoid, minimize and compensate the impact arising from the Project.

11.2                                     Mitigation Measures

11.2.1                               Avoidance

Avoidance of Recognised Sites of Conservation Importance

All the recognised sites of conservation importance, including Country Parks, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs), Ecologically Important Streams (EISs), and existing / proposed Marine Parks have been avoided and will not be encroached by any developments under the present Project.

Avoidance of Tung Chung Bay and Associated High Value Habitats

The majority of the habitat types with high or higher ecological values have been avoided. In the RODP, there will be no reclamation at TCW in order to protect the Tung Chung Bay.  As there is no reclamation inside Tung Chung Bay, the Tung Chung Bay (including coastal waters and estuary of Tung Chung Stream) and associated habitats including the seagrass beds, mudflats, mangroves habitats, will be preserved.

Avoidance of Tung Chung Stream

For terrestrial habitats, encroachment of Tung Chung Stream has been avoided. All natural sections of Tung Chung Stream (including the two main branches and the joined outlet section) and one major tributary at Ngau Au have also been provided with buffer zones to cover the riparian zone, except where overlapped with the road crossings of local distributors.  The widths of buffer zones are in general 30m (except locations without sufficient space) for the two main branches and the joined outlet section, and in general 20m for the major tributary at Ngau Au.  In principle, the buffer zones should not be less than the recommended widths except with constraints such as without sufficient space or adjacent to existing developed areas such as villages. The recommended widths of buffer zones are based on the previous practices for EIS and other approved EIAs.  For example, 30m buffer was provided for Sha Lo Tung Stream SSSI.  Lin Ma Hang Stream has been designated as SSSI and is listed as one of the 33 EISs, and therefore the land corridor adjoining Lin Ma Hang Stream at the downstream area where there had already been settlements/community is also zoned "Green Belt" (~20m) to serve as a vegetated buffer to separate the village area from the river. Buffer zones of 5-20m were established in main streams on Kau Sai Chau for protection of habitats of aquatic fauna, including the endemic Atyid shrimp Caridina trifasciata during the construction works of the public golf course extension (Black & Veatch 2005).  Caridina trifasciata are still found in these main streams during the construction phase as well as operation phase monitoring for the public golf course.  In the EIA study “North East New Territories New Development Areas Planning and Engineering Study – Investigation”, Ma Tso Lung Stream was ranked as high ecological value in the upper and midstream sections, and a buffer zone of 15-30 m is proposed and considered appropriate.

11.2.2                               Minimisation

Selection of Proposed Development Areas in TCW PDA

Locations and extents of development parcels and other development areas in TCW PDA have been selected and adjusted to avoid as far as possible and minimise potential impacts to existing ecological resources. For example, developments in Fong Yuen area are limited to the Northern section of Fong Yuen area, which is more disturbed and fragmented, and thus of lower ecological value. The Middle Section and the Southern Section, which are of higher ecological value, were not proposed for developments and were zoned as Green Belt except a small area of existing urbanised/disturbed inside the Southern Section.

Preservation of Habitats with Ecological Values

Conservation or non-development land uses such as Conservation Area (CA) zoning, Coastal Protection Area (CPA) zoning, Green Belt (GB) zoning, and Agricultural (Agr) zoning, were proposed for various locations at TCW PDA. Developments within these zonings are basically prohibited.  These areas will include Middle and Southern Sections of Fong Yuen area, Fung Shui Woods and part of the buffer zone of Tung Chung Stream. 

Fung Shui Woods which fall within the RODP boundary will be covered by either CA or GB, except those in “V” land use zones which are following the current village area boundaries.  Fung Shui Woods considered of higher ecological value (i.e. moderate to high) due to larger sizes and/or better conditions are covered by CA, while those of lower ecological value (i.e. moderate) due to smaller sizes or higher disturbance level are covered by “GB”.

The buffer zone for Tung Chung Stream will be zoned as “CA”, ‘CPA”, or “OU” except where overlapped with road crossings.  For CA and CPA, only development needed to support the conservation of the existing landscape of scenic quality of the area or are essential infrastructure projects with overriding public interest may be permitted, such as the outlets of the Stormwater Attenuation and Treatment Ponds.  For OU, this zoning is mainly proposed for polders and the future River Park.  Though construction works will be required for the outlets, the polders and/or the future River Park, the scale of the construction works would not be large and mitigation to prevent site runoff affecting stream courses have been proposed under water quality assessment.  Furthermore, these future polders and River Park would be managed by Government after construction, and could thus better protect the stream, and the Stormwater Attenuation and Treatment Ponds will have wetlands incorporated and could provide additional habitats for fauna.  As Enhancement Measures, native riparian tree and shrub species will also be planted on the earth-line polders and aquatic plants will be planted in biofiltration zone of Stormwater Attenuation and Treatment Ponds.

Non-development zoning on the RODP has been provided along a large section of Tung Chung Bay coastline such as CPA (as buffer zone) and RO/DO (with purpose-designed paths and landscape areas) to reduce potential disturbance impacts to the nearby natural habitats such as mangroves and mudflats in Tung Chung Bay, especially from the potential increase of visitors.

Limiting Works near Tung Chung Stream

Limited crossings for Tung Chung Stream would be required. It is understood the stream bed and stream banks would not be encroached, and the detail design would continue to explore suitable design so as to avoid the buffer zone as far as possible.

Refinement of Road Alignment/Design to Minimize Impact on Fung Shui Woods

Small areas (0.04 ha) of Fung Shui Wood loss (near the crossing of Tung Chung Stream eastern branch, and near TCV-5b) will be caused by the road upgrading along the existing Shek Mun Kap Road due to the space constraints. It is recommended that during the later detailed design stage or construction stage, efforts should be made to reduce or even avoid the impact on Fung Shui Woods as far as possible, subject to the later refinement of the alignment, the layout design, and the number and locations of trees to be proposed felling.

Noise Barrier & Bird Collision

In order to minimise the potential impact of bird collision, only solid noise barrier will be used during construction phase.  Noise barrier will only be erected at a few locations in the TCE PDA during operation phase.  Transparent noise barrier will be avoided as far as possible.  If transparent panel will be used, stickers or other measures will be applied to increase the visibility of the panels to birds.

Reduction of the Reclamation Sizes

The total reclamation size under this Project has also been significantly reduced after the reclamation inside Tung Chung Bay was removed.  On comparing to the original scheme with 50ha reclamation, the current scheme with the removal of TCW reclamation, has prevented loss or encroachment of ecological resources or deteriorations of water quality condition in Tung Chung Bay.  The potential direct impact from reclamation has been minimised.

Location of the Reclamations

The entire TCE PDA development as well as the Road P1 (Tung Chung - Tai Ho Section) are on new reclamations.  The footprint of the proposed reclamations is at the location among the lowest use, if not none, by CWD inside North Lantau waters, and is not found to be important for other marine fauna of conservation importance.

Adopting Non-dredged Method

In order to minimize the potential impacts caused by the reclamation, a number of alternative construction methodologies has been critically examined.  After considering all the options such as fully dredged, partially dredged and non-dredged methods for seawall construction and reclamation, non-dredged method for both the seawall construction and reclamation are recommended.  By adopting non-dredged method, several potential impacts have been minimised.  The disturbance of seabed sediments will be greatly reduced without the dredging process, and the water quality impacts caused by suspended solid or sediment plumes will be minimised.  This construction method also minimizes the generation of dredged materials, and in turn reduces the marine vessel trips for transportation of dredged materials, and finally reduces the potential of off-site impacts such as the associated impacts on water quality and marine ecology near the disposal facilities.

Maintaining Tai Ho Wan Outlet

The design of the reclamation has taken into account the importance of the existing Tai Ho outlet for the ecology of Tai Ho Wan, and has minimized the extent of reclamation for Road P1, and maintaining the opening of the outlet in the new reclamation.

Avoiding the Overlapping of Construction Programmes with Concurrent Projects

During the EIA study, the known and anticipated construction programmes of other concurrent projects have been examined. Based on the available information, the currently proposed reclamation construction programme for the present Project only overlaps with two concurrent marine projects, i.e. 3RS and the CMP at East Sha Chau. This has minimized the implications on water quality impacts due to concurrent projects.

No emergency discharge in TCE and TCW

Sewage pumping stations will be present in TCE and TCE, but there will be back up measures and suitable designs to prevent emergency discharge accidents.

Reducing the Capacity of the Proposed Marina

The scale of the proposed marina in TCE PDA has been reduced from a capacity for 350 vessels to the currently proposed capacity for 95 vessels.

11.2.3                               Mitigation

Compensation Woodland Planting

Compensation Woodland Planting is proposed to mitigate the woodland loss (total 5.72 ha, including 5.3ha from TCW PDA and 0.42 from the service reservoirs) and a small loss of Fung Shui Wood (0.20 ha).  A search of area to mitigate the loss of woodland has been conducted.  Priority has been given to the practicability of compensation of woodland within the boundary of RODP. Given the nature of the project is to provide development opportunities to satisfy the needs for the society in general and the aspirations of local communities (see Section 2 of the EIA report), compensation of woodland is only possible for the areas beyond the RODP.  Efforts have been also been expedited to identify locations that would be suitable for woodland compensation.  After considering a number of requirements such as the existing vegetation cover, the accessibility for planting and future maintenance, and the ecological linkage with other existing habitats after the compensation woodland is established, it is considered that the areas adjoining the woodlands near the existing service reservoirs, and hillsides to the east of Tung Chung Road, would be suitable locations.  The advantage of these locations is that there are existing woodlands immediately downhill to the location and the Sheung Ling Pei Fung Shui Wood is further downhill behind Sheung Ling Pei Village, planting new woodland areas adjoining existing woodlands would form an ecological linkage and increase the overall habitat size and hence would help to enhance the biodiversity and ecological values in the long run. And it is noted that the compensation trees for landscape impacts will also be planted near the future service reservoirs. With woodland compensation on the hillsides to the east of Tung Chung Road, further ecological linkage could be formed.   These 3 major areas, of a total area about 11 ha, which have been identified as suitable for compensation woodland planting are illustrated in Figure 9.11 of the EIA report. The selected locations are grassy/shrubby with little tree cover.  The slope gradients ranged between 20o to 30o.  Tree whips and shrub seedlings would be used for the planting mix. The feasibility of commencing woodland compensation planting as soon as practicable should be considered. The tree species to be planted should mostly be native species recorded at the Assessment Area (e.g. those reported in Appendix 9.2 of the EIA report) for woodland compensation, and the two areas uphill to Sheung Ling Pei should also make reference to the existing tree species reported in FSW habitat. A list of plant species recommended for compensatory woodland planting is provided in Appendix 9.21 of the EIA report.  Early and timely arrangement with forest nursery for propagation of the seedlings should be made to ensure the availability of both the species and the quantity required.

With the 11 ha of compensation woodland, it is sufficient to mitigate the loss of about 6 ha of woodland and FSW from TCW PDA and service reservoirs.  In addition to the native species, the planting list will also contain some fruit tree species which could provide habitats for wildlife including those reported in Orchard habitats. In order to protect the compensation woodland from potential disturbance by fires, fire resistant species (e.g., Schima superba) will be planted in the periphery.  The compensation woodland will be maintained by the project proponent (i.e. CEDD) for 10 years before handing over to the government (i.e. Lands Department).  The survival and conditions of the planted trees should be inspected during the maintenance period and replant where necessary.

Planting of Emergent Plant inside the future River Park

River Park is proposed at Tung Chung Stream, covering the full length of the channelized section together with the immediate upstream natural section alongside Fong Yuen area up to Shek Mun Kap Road.  Though detailed design of the River Park has not been confirmed at this stage, it is anticipated that planting and features beneficial for ecology will be provided.  It is suggested planting of emergent plant species including the larval food plant of the rare butterfly species Jhora Scrub Hopper, i.e. Leersia hexandra, should be provided in the future River Park, to provide habitats for this butterfly, and to compensate the loss of their habitats (wet abandoned agricultural land) in northern section of Fong Yuen.  Currently the River Park covers an area size of about 3.98 ha, with about 3.3 ha land area (if excluding area of watercourses), and in which there is 1.25 ha of existing urbanised/disturbed area.  It is suggested that at least 0.5 ha of emergent planting should be included in the future design of the River Park.  A list of recommended plant species for the future River Park is shown in Appendix 9.22 of the EIA report.  It is recommended that the future operator of the River Park should make reference to the recommended plant list when designing the landscape and make early arrangement for the availability and sufficient quantity of suitable plant species.

Capture and Translocation Exercise

Within the PDA of TCW, amphibian species of conservation importance were recorded in some areas to be directly disturbed during construction phase, and mitigation measures are recommended.  Romer’s Tree Frogs were mainly recorded near the eastern branch of Tung Chung Stream, inside or near orchard and woodland habitats.  Chinese Bull Frog was found in orchard near Shek Mun Kap.  Capture-and-translocation of amphibian species of conservation importance will be implemented in areas with sightings prior to site formation to minimize the impacts on these fauna species of conservation importance.

The exercise will cover areas for public works near the eastern branch of Tung Chung Stream, in particular 1) the River Park, 2) the Distributor Road along the eastern branch of Tung Chung Stream, 3) the road upgrade along the existing Shek Mun Kap Road, and 4) the attenuation and treatment ponds in TCV-k, TCV-e, TCV-l, TCV-c, and TCV-n.  Capture-and-translocation exercise for those public works will be provided before site formation commences by the government departments responsible for the construction of those public works or the site formation works for those sites.

Capture-and-translocation exercise of amphibian species of conservation importance will also be required in TCV-1 and TCV-5 which are zoned for residential/commercial developments by private developers and the lands within mostly belong to private lots.  The future project proponents of those private lots shall be requested to conduct capture-and-translocation exercise prior to site formation via the established mechanism for land transaction application.  The requirements of these measures will be stipulated in the explanatory statement of the OZP.

The above public works and development parcels for residential are near the eastern branch, and cover the sighting locations, and are thus suitable for capture-translocation survey.  The survey should be undertaken by ecologists with relevant experience.  Besides the primary target of Romer’s Tree Frog and Chinese Bull Frog, other amphibian species of conservation importance should also be translocated if encountered during the capture survey.  Captured individuals will be released to suitable habitats with no or low records of these species during the surveys (e.g., Chinese Bullfrog: agricultural land in San Tau; Romer’s Tree Frog: woodland along the path to San Tau).  Romer’s Tree Frogs captured in Chek Lap Kok were translocated to seven recipient sites with suitable habitats but no record of this species (Chan et al. 2005).

There are proven track records of translocation of amphibians in Hong Kong. Capture-and-translocation exercise of Romer’s Tree Frog had been conducted previously during the construction of the Hong Kong International Airport in Chek Lap Kok (Lau 1998).  Post monitoring surveys showed that the populations were established in translocation. Capture-and-translocation exercise of Romer’s Tree Frog were also conducted during the construction stage of drainage improvement project in Mui Wo (Ecosystems Ltd. 2009).  

Habitats of Romer’s Tree Frog will not be affected in the PDA at TCE, and hence capture-and-translocation exercise will not be necessary.  Romer’s Tree Frogs were also recorded in area not be affected by construction works such as those to be zoned as CPA, and ravine woodland at upper section of Wong Lung Hang Stream.  No capture-and-translocation exercise is needed for these areas.

Two criteria stated in Lau (1998) will be used in the selection of translocation sites of Romer’s Tree Frog.  These included 1) a large area of forest or plantation; 2) suitable breeding habitats, i.e., shaded, slow-flowing or standing waters with plenty of leaf litter.  For Chinese Bullfrog, locations with their preferred habitats (e.g., ponds, cultivated lands, streams, marshes) (Chan et al. 2005) will be selected as translocation sites.

Preservation and/or Transplantation of Plant Species of Conservation Importance

Preservation and/or Transplantation of plant species of conservation importance, including Aquilaria sinensis, Pavetta hongkongensis, and Gmelina chinensis will be conducted before site formation works.  Though Goodyera procera and Gymnosphaera hancockii were not recorded in the present EIA study, if found before site formation works, these species will also be preserved and/or transplanted.  Priority should be given to on-site preservation, especially for large sized individuals, and followed by transplantation, which is more feasible for small-sized individuals/seedlings.

Preservation and/or Transplantation of plant species of conservation importance will cover all areas for public works, provided before site formation commences by the government departments responsible for the construction of those public works or the site formation works for those sites. This measure will also be required in TCV-1 in where plant species of conservation importance were recorded, and which are zoned for residential/commercial developments by private developers and the lands within mostly belong to private lots.  The future project proponents of those private lots shall be requested to conduct preservation and/or Transplantation of plant species of conservation importance prior to site formation via the established mechanism for land transaction application.  The requirements of these measures will be stipulated in the explanatory statement of the OZP.

Defining and Maintaining Construction Site Boundaries

Site hoarding should be erected along the interface with natural terrestrial habitats of moderate to high / high ecological value (including secondary woodland, Fung Shui Wood, natural section of Tung Chung Stream), if any, to properly delineate the works site boundary and screen and minimise the potential disturbance due to construction activities to the nearby habitats and associated terrestrial fauna during construction phase.  In addition, erecting of site hoarding along northern section of Fong Yuen (i.e. TCV-6) is also recommended since sighting records of the rare butterfly Jhora Scrub Hopper were aggregated in the northern end of the middle section of Fong Yuen.

Fences will be installed along the buffer zones of the Tung Chung Streams, mature woodland and Fung Shui Wood to minimise trespassing to these habitats and plants of conservation importance close to the site boundary.

Access Roads: The development areas will be mostly accessed by existing road network during both construction and operational phases. The temporary or permanent loss of habitats due to construction of temporary or permanent access is kept to minimum.

Protection of Tung Chung Stream

Construction Works near Tung Chung Stream: Though encroachment on natural sections of Tung Chung Stream has been avoided, there will be developments in Tung Chung Valley and the site runoff might potentially disturb Tung Chung Stream. According to the RODP, an approximate 30m buffer zone for the natural sections of Tung Chung Stream and an approximate 20m buffer zone for the major tributary near Ngau Au will be zoned as “CA”, “CPA”, or “OU” (for polders and the future River Park), except the road crossing locations. Precast structures or other similar approaches will be used as far as possible to minimize the potential pollution from construction works.  There will also be polders to be constructed for some sections of Tung Chung Stream.  But the polders will be located at the landward side of the buffer zone and thus there will still be some distances to the stream channels.  With the buffer zone, together with good site management which are stipulated in ProPECC PN1/94 and will be fully implemented so that the treated runoff will be discharged to public drainage system in compliance with the WPCO. 

Road Crossings at Tung Chung Stream and Polder Construction: The local distributors will be extended to connect to existing villages like Ngau Au, Lam Che, Nim Yuen and Mok Ka.  Although a few sections of these local distributors (in a form of bridge deck) will have to span over the Tung Chung Stream and its tributaries, only the footings of the bridge deck, which are considerably small in size, will be located within the area above high water mark near the stream banks.  Considered that there is only relatively limited works for the footing construction and the area affected would likely be the area above high water mark with relatively less disturbance on ecological habitat.  Precast structures or other similar approaches will be used as far as possible to minimize the potential pollution from construction works.  Good site management as stipulated in ProPECC PN1/94 will be fully implemented so that the treated runoff will be discharged to public drainage system in compliance with the WPCO.  Adverse impact on Tung Chung Stream is not anticipated.

It is recommended that the design of crossings (likely to be in the form of bridges) should be reviewed at the detailed design stage of the project to determine the optimum design to minimise construction and operational phase impacts on Tung Chung Stream and on fauna using the stream courses. Design and construction parameters should be reviewed to address the following requirements and objectives:

·             Maximization of the span of bridge piers to span over the stream course

·             Minimization of the sizes of any piers within the 30m buffer zone

·             Avoidance and minimization of changes to the hydrological regime of the stream courses; including avoidance of changes to flow of streams

·             Minimization of the duration of construction, by giving consideration to off-site pre-fabrication of bridges and bridge elements

·             Construction of each crossing will be scheduled so as there is no overlap, in order to reduce disturbance impacts

Similar exercises should be conducted for the polders at the detailed design stage of the project, to address the following objectives:

·             Minimization of the duration of construction,

·             Construction of the polders or section of polders will be scheduled to minimize overlapping or limit the works fronts, in order to reduce disturbance impacts

·             To schedule the construction within dry season as far as possible

·             Avoidance and minimization of changes to the hydrological regime of the stream courses; including avoidance of changes to flow of streams

During the construction phase, a temporary drainage system would be implemented to ensure that the surface run-off with high concentration of suspended solid (SS) would not be discharged to Tung Chung Stream.  Runoff would need to pass through sedimentation tanks to reduce the concentration of SS.  DSD Technical Circular No. 2/2004 and ETWB TCW No. 5/2005 which set out for the protection of natural rivers and streams from adverse impacts arising from construction works should be followed during construction works near streams.  In accordance with the Practice Note for Professional Persons on Construction Site Drainage, Environmental Protection Department, 1994 (ProPECC PN 1/94), best management practices should be implemented on site as far as practicable to control site runoff and drainage at all work sites during construction.

Other Site Practices

Standard Site Practices listed as follows would be implemented to minimise potential impacts, including dust, noise and site runoff, on the surrounding environment:

·             Regular checking should be undertaken to ensure that the work site boundaries are not exceeded and that no damage occurs to surrounding areas;

·             Implementation of mitigation measures specified in ProPECC PN 1/94 to control site runoff and drainage at all work sites during construction;

·             Implementation of noise control measures at all construction sites to reduce impacts of construction noise to wildlife habitats adjacent works areas;

·             Implementation of dust control measures at all construction sites to minimise dust nuisance to adjacent wildlife habitats during construction activities;

·             Construction debris and spoil should be covered up and/or properly disposed of as soon as possible to avoid being washed into nearby waterbodies by rain;

·             Good site practice and site precautionary measures will also be implemented to avoid the potential impact due to site runoff. Construction effluent, site run-off and sewage should be properly collected and/or treated. Wastewater from a construction site should be managed with the following approach in descending order;

·             Proper locations for discharge outlets of wastewater treatment facilities well away from the natural streams/rivers should be identified;

·             Effluent monitoring should be incorporated to make sure that the discharged effluent from construction sites meets the effluent discharge guidelines; and

·             Supervisory staff should be assigned to station on site to closely supervise and monitor the works.

With the implementation of good site practice, the potential impact due to dust, noise and site runoff during construction phase is anticipated to be acceptable.

Prevention of Emergency Discharge in Proposed and Upgraded Sewage Pumping Stations in TCE and TCW

There will be no emergency discharge from the proposed and upgraded sewage pumping stations in TCE and TCW, for the protection of ecological sensitive receivers of Tung Chug Stream and Tung Chung Bay.  The following mitigation measures / additional provisions are proposed to enhance the sewerage network reliability and minimize the environmental impacts due to system failure or in case of emergency situations:

·             100% standby pumping capacity within each SPS, with spare pump up to 50% pumping capacity stockpiled in each SPS for any emergency use;

·             Twin rising mains;

·             Dual-feed power supply;

·             Emergency storage facilities up to 6-hours ADWF capacity; and

·             Emergency communication mechanism amongst relevant government departments.

With the implemented mitigation measures, emergency discharge of sewage from the proposed SPSs in TCE and TCW is not anticipated.

Furthermore, in order to prevent pipe bursting, it is proposed to adopt high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe for proposed gravity sewers and rising mains.  As gravity sewers will not be pressurized, they carry no risk of bursting.  Further protection on proposed rising mains with concrete surround will be provided to mitigate the risk of bursting.  With the above proposed measures, bursting discharge is not expected and no adverse impact on ecology due to bursting discharge is anticipated.

Eco-shoreline

There would be inevitable permanent losses of marine waters (sub-tidal soft bottom seabed and water column), and direct impacts on existing artificial seawalls due to the reclamation.  For the direct impact on artificial seawalls, as they are of low ecological value, the impact is considered insignificant and specific mitigation measure is not required, and there will be new seawalls of longer length on the future new reclamations.  The permanent losses of marine waters, given the relatively larger sizes, are considered Minor to Moderate, and provision of mitigation measures is recommended.

The present proposed reclamation location has taken into account the constraints and avoided sensitive ecological resources such as Tung Chung Bay and Tai Ho Wan in the area and is located in the waters of very low dolphin use, therefore the impact would be the loss of common marine waters habitats.  If the design of the future seawall could be improved to provide higher ecological functions than normal seawalls, it is expected that the enhanced functions from the future seawalls could mitigate the impact of the loss.

Adopting Eco-shoreline design

An ‘eco-shoreline’ is any shoreline which provides beneficial functions to the local ecosystem through a range of active or passive solutions, whilst providing coastal protection.  As discussed above, the proposed reclamation in TCE PDA and that for Road P1 (Tung Chung - Tai Ho Section) Extension would be constructed along the existing artificial seawall. While the original artificial seawall has limited ecological values, due considerations have been given to consider the practicability of enhancing these new artificial seawall by providing eco-shoreline, which would help to provide better ecological functions as compared to the existing artificial seawall.  It is however noted that the western artificial seawall of TCE PDA would be close to the marine navigation channel which would constrain the implementation of eco-shoreline.  For the new artificial seawall along the Road P1 (Tung Chung - Tai Ho Section) Extension, the possibility of implementing eco-shoreline would be relatively more favourable.  The extent of the future eco-shoreline covering the coastline of Road P1 (Tung Chung - Tai Ho Section) as well as the eastern coastline of TCE-PDA up to the opening of the marina is considered feasible and hence recommended.

While there are a number of variations on the approach of designing eco-shoreline, it is expected that the eco-shoreline (e.g. a sloping rip-rap form) could provide suitable habitats for colonization of intertidal and subtidal epifauna and juveniles of marine fauna and thereby effectively enhance the ecological function of the new seawalls.  If feasible, a strip of platform with muddy substrates could be incorporated into the sloping seawalls, to further facilitate the colonisation of estuarine plants and soft substrate fauna. It is therefore recommended that during the detailed design of the reclamation, a study should be conducted to investigate the proper form of eco-shoreline to be adopted for  the artificial seawall along the reclamation for TCE PDA and Road P1 (Tung Chung - Tai Ho Section) Extension, and to devise the implementation scheme for incorporation into the reclamation construction programme.  An Eco-shoreline study report covering the recommendations of the proper form of eco-shoreline to be adopted, the detailed design of the eco-shoreline and the implementation programme will be submitted for the approval of the authority before commencement of reclamation works.

Mitigation for Marine Water Quality

Based on the latest design, the use of non-dredged reclamation method is adopted. Should dredging be inevitable, suitable mitigation measures to the dredging activities should be implemented in accordance the recommendations proposed under Water Quality chapter of the EIA report.

Silt curtains have been proposed as mitigation for reclamation works.  Other possible mitigation measures for inevitable dredging, if any, include using closed grab dredgers and control of dredge rate.  Reduction in dredging rate (which in turn would prolong the dredging duration) will decrease the dispersion of suspended solids.

Besides, the number of concurrent dredging/filling work fronts should be limited, and the seawall should be constructed prior to the filling works.  All reclamation filling works should be conducted within a leading seawall of 200m or enclosed by seawall.

The dredged marine sediment may contain organic materials and lead to a decreased in dissolved oxygen.  Re-suspension of seabed sediment might potentially incur the release of contaminants, if any, into the seawater.  If contaminants are present in the seawater, they may eventually be taken up into food chains.  As non-dredged reclamation method was adopted, dredging activities would be limited.  The above-mentioned mitigation measures for the dredging activities could further mitigate the DO depletion or the potential release of contaminants.

Good Site Practices for Water Quality in Marine Works

Good site practices shall be applied for the filling works, which are the largest potential sources for marine water quality impacts.

·             Water quality monitoring (including monitoring at two stations within the The Brothers Marine Park) shall be implemented to ensure effective control of water pollution and recommend additional mitigation measures required;

·             The decent speed of grabs shall be controlled to minimize the seabed impact and to reduce the volume of over-dredging according to the assumed filling rate in water quality assessment;

·             A perimeter silt curtain shall be installed during the entire reclamation periods, and the integrity and effectiveness of all silt curtains should be regularly inspected;

·             Barges or hoppers shall not be filled to a level which will cause overflow of materials or pollution of water during loading or transportation;

·             Excess materials shall be cleaned from the decks and exposed fittings of barges before the vessels are moved;

·             Plants should not be operated with leaking pipes and any pipe leakages shall be repaired quickly;

·             Adequate freeboard shall be maintained on barges to reduce the likelihood of decks being washed by wave action; 

·             All vessels should be sized so that adequate clearance is maintained between vessels and the seabed in all tide conditions, to ensure that undue turbidity is not generated by turbulence from vessel movement or propeller wash; and

·             The works shall not cause foam, oil, grease, litter or other objectionable matter to be present in the water within and adjacent to the works site.

Besides the above good site practices for filling works, there are also good site practices for pollution generated from general construction works and sewage from workforce.  Effluent monitoring should be incorporated to make sure that the discharged effluent from construction sites meets the effluent discharge guidelines.

Strict enforcement on no-dumping

Restrictions prohibiting dumping of rubbish, food, oil, or chemicals should be strictly enforced.  This should also be covered in the contractor briefings.

Spill Response Plan

There will also be a spill response plan if vessels operating in the works areas will be transporting oil or other hazardous chemicals.  The oil spill response plan will have specific provisions for protecting marine ecological resources.   Given these measures, the marine ecosystem in the area would be protected.

Maintenance Dredging during the operation of the Proposed Marina

The volume of dredged material would be relatively small as compared with the construction phase impact. As the SS release would be within a semi-enclosed bay, the dispersion of SS would be constrained locally.  The SS impact to the closest receiver WSR 43 future seawater intake for Tung Chung, which is located 1.2km far away from the mouth of marina, is not anticipated.  Silt curtain should be deployed to reduce the sediment dispersion from the dredging inside the marina.

Control and Minimisation of Marine Traffic

Disturbance impact to dolphin due to increase of working vessels is ranked as Minor to Moderate.  It is recommended that approaches to reduce the marine traffic, including using larger-sized barges, land transportation of materials, and also reuse of excavation and C&D materials from the land-based works of the present Project, should be adopted as mitigation.

Larger-sized Barges

If barges of larger sized are used, more filling materials could be carried in each trip of the barges and it could reduce the marine traffic volume during construction.  The feasibility of using larger barges for carrying filling materials has been investigated.  The largest barge may be up to 5,000 tonnes in capacity and could be equivalent of 10-20 normal sized barges. But the number of this type of barges available in the region at the time of the present proposed reclamation would be subject to various factors, and therefore it could not confirm at this stage the amount or proportion of filling materials could be taken up by larger barges.  But it is anticipated that if larger barge and land transportation (see below) are adopted for filling materials, it can help to reduce some (not more than 10%) of marine traffic.  In the construction stage, the future contractors will be requested to submit a “Proposal on Reducing Marine Traffic” to authorities for approval before commencement of filling works, in which the contractors will need to detail measures adopted to reduce the marine vessel trip numbers and the traffic volume (except those for marine site investigation and survey works given the relatively minor number), including using more larger sized barges.  The future contractors will have the responsibility to take into account the best available information at that time to verify the market availability at the time of construction and to arrange larger barges as many as possible for transporting the filling materials for the Project.

Land Transportation of Materials

Besides using larger barge, transportation of fill materials via land traffic is also possible to reduce the marine traffic.  The present Project involves near shore reclamation and the site could be accessed by land transportation.  The feasibility of using land transportation for carrying filling materials has also been investigated.  The land traffic capacity of the Tung Chung area should be considered.  And thus it is subject to approval by government departments on the quantity of fill materials could be taken up by land transportation.  It is anticipated that if larger barge (see above) and land transportation are adopted for filling materials, it can help to reduce some (not more than 10%) of marine traffic.  In the construction stage, the future contractors will be requested to submit a “Proposal on Reducing Marine Traffic” to authorities for approval before commencement of filling works, in which the contractors will need to detail measures adopted to reduce the marine vessel trip numbers and the traffic volume (except those for marine site investigation and survey works given the relatively minor number), including using more land transportation.  The future contractors will have the responsibility to arrange and/or apply land transportation for transporting the filling materials for the Project.

Reuse of C&D Materials

In accordance with the waste management assessment of the present EIA, based on the construction programme, all inert C& D materials would be reused on-site during the whole construction phase, including the reclamation works.  All C&D materials arising from the construction would be sorted on-site to recover the inert C&D materials and promptly remove all sorted and processed material arising the construction activities.  It is expected that, though the exact quantity could not be confirmed at this stage, by reusing the inert C&D materials, it could replace a portion of the fill materials and reduce the marine traffic for the fill transportation.  In the construction stage, the future contractors will be requested to submit a “Proposal on Reducing Marine Traffic” to authorities for approval before commencement of filling works, in which the contractors will need to detail measures adopted to reduce the marine vessel trip numbers and the traffic volume (except those for marine site investigation and survey works given the relatively minor number), including reuse of C&D materials.  The future contractors will have the responsibility to arrange and collect C& D materials for replacing part of the filling materials for the Project.

Speed Limits and Regular Routes of Works Vessels

The potential of marine traffic disturbance or collision risk due to the work-related vessel traffic flow during construction phase is also considered.  The potential of an escalation in collision risk would be low as mainly large-sized and slower vessels.  (It is considered that the high-speed outboard engine boats pose higher risk on collision.)  But there still might be disturbance impact due to the marine traffic.  Further to the above measures to reduce marine traffic volume, measures adopted by other EIAs for mitigating marine traffic disturbance on CWD, such as speed limits and regular routes, will also be applied to further mitigate the impact.  In the construction stage, CEDD will prepare and submit a “Works Vessel Travel Route Plan” to authorities for approval before commencement of filling works.  The submission will cover the routes, the speed limit, and other practices the vessels need to adopt, except those for marine site investigation and survey works given the relatively minor number.  Works vessels should follow regular routes to limit the extent of marine areas with works vessels traffic, especially within BMP.  It is recommended that the future travel routes of TCE PDA will avoid and/or restrict the extents within ecologically sensitive areas targeted for CWD conservation.  Works vessels also need to follow all existing regulations, restrictions, and practices for works vessels (such as speed limits, and any other practices).  For examples, as part of the good site practices, the fill materials on the barges should be properly loaded to avoid any overflow of materials.  The bottom openings of the hoppers should be properly maintained.  The works vessels will be requested to adopt more stringent standards when inside BMP.  For example, during normal circumstances, the works vessels should further reduce the speed from 10 knot (the statutory vessel speed within marine parks) to 8 knot.  There should be no stopover or anchoring at the existing anchoring area within BMP, even these actions are not prohibiting by regulations.  A Core Area around Siu Mo To has been demarcated to provide the highest level of protection to prey sources of CWD and fisheries resources.  No works vessels will enter the core area of BMP. The magnitude of any marine traffic disturbance impact would thus be controlled.

Precautionary Measures - Dolphin Exclusion Zone

As a precautionary measure, dolphin exclusion zone of 250m radius is suggested to be implemented in the reclamation and dredging sites during the installation of the perimeter silt curtains and any re-deployment of the perimeter silt curtains.  A dolphin watching plan will be implemented for the exclusion zone.  Works should not be commenced until a 30 minute of no dolphin sighting is made within the exclusion zone and will be suspended when any CWD is found within the exclusion zone.

11.3                                     Audit Requirement

Site audits shall be undertaken during the construction phase of the Project to check the proper implementation and maintenance of recommended mitigation measures.

A project organisation consisting of the Engineer Representative (ER), Independent Environmental Checker (IEC), Environmental Team (ET), Project Proponent (CEDD) and Contractor should be established to take on the responsibilities for environmental protection for the Project.

Site inspections shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week to checking the implementation of standard site practices and measures of protection of natural streams (DSD Technical Circular No. 2004).

Site hoardings and fences will be checked weekly by the ET.  Damage sighted should be reported to the site manager and damaged site hoarding/fence should be repaired by the Contractor as soon as possible.

Site inspection shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week to check the implementation of standard site practices for marine works, strict enforcement on no-dumping and spill response plan.

Site inspection shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week to check all silt curtains are located entirely within the boundary of the temporary works area and are still functioning.

Site inspection shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week during the reclamation to check all reclamation filling works are within a leading seawall of 200m or enclosed by seawall.

A “Proposal on Reducing Marine Traffic” for size of barges, land transportation of materials, and reuse of C&D materials, will be submitted by future contractors. Site inspection shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week to check the implementation of the proposed items in the “Proposal on Reducing Marine Traffic”.

A “Works Vessel Travel Route Plan” will be submitted by CEDD. Site inspection shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week to check if the works vessels follow the proposed routes and other requirements in the Plan.

Site inspection shall be undertaken by the ET at least once per week to check if the dolphin exclusion zone and dolphin watching plan are implemented in the reclamation and dredging sites during the installation of the perimeter silt curtains and any re-deployment of the perimeter silt curtains.

11.4                                     Monitoring Requirements

11.4.1                               Monitoring for Compensation Woodland

A total area about 11 ha of compensation woodland planting will be conducted to mitigate the loss of woodland, Fung Shui Wood, and orchard.  Three proposed locations have been identified as suitable for compensation woodland planting: two uphill to the Sheung Ling Pei FSW, and one on the hillside to the east of Tung Chung Road. All these areas are outside all development areas, and thus in advance compensation planting is feasible and should be considered, especially the two areas uphill to Sheung Ling Pei FSW.

Survival and establishment of planted woodland at the three planting locations will be monitored quarterly for 3 years. The monitoring surveys shall be carried out by qualified botanist and ecologist.  Survey in each woodland planting location will commence three months after completion of planting.  Selected individuals of each planted species will be tagged and percentage survival computed. Supplementary planting will be recommended when necessary. Wildlife use of the planted woodland will also be monitored.

11.4.2                               Monitoring for Emergent Plant inside the future River Park

Planting of emergent plant species including the larval food plant of the rare butterfly species Jhora Scrub Hopper, i.e. Leersia hexandra, will be provided in the future River Park. 

Survival and establishment of planted emergent plants in the future River Park will be monitored quarterly for 2 years.  The monitoring surveys shall be carried out by a qualified botanist and ecologist.  Survey in the future River Park will commence three months after completion of planting.  Selected individuals of each planted species will be checked and percentage survival computed.  Supplementary planting will be recommended when necessary.  Wildlife use of the planted vegetation will also be monitored.

11.4.3                               Monitoring for Translocated Amphibians of Conservation Importance

Amphibian species of conservation importance will be captured and translocated to suitable habitats prior to commencement of site formation.  The capture-and-translocation exercise targets on species potentially impacted by construction activities, including Romer’s Tree Frog and Chinese Bullfrog.

Establishment of the translocated Romer’s Tree Frog and Chinese Bullfrog in the released location(s) will be studied.  Post translocation monitoring shall be carried out by qualified ecologist.

The establishment of translocated populations of Romer’s Tree Frog and Chinese Bullfrog in the release sites will be determined by observations of occurrence of reproduction during the breeding season following the capture-and-translocation exercise.  Both Romer’s Tree Frog and Chinese Bullfrog breed between March and September in Hong Kong (Chan et al. 2005).  At least three surveys will be conducted in each release site during the breeding season, preferably monthly between April and June, Signs of breeding including calling males, eggs and tadpoles will be indications of breeding.

11.4.4                               Monitoring for Preserved/Transplanted Plant Species of Conservation Importance

Monitoring surveys will be conducted to verify and evaluate the effectiveness of the preservation and transplantation programme.

For plant species of conservation importance, the survival and conditions of transplanted plant individuals as well as individuals to be preserved in-situ will be monitored.  For transplanted individuals, the monitoring will be two years, and the frequency will be monthly for the first year, and then quarterly for the second year.  For the in-situ preserved plant individuals, the monitoring will be conducted monthly throughout the construction period. The monitoring surveys shall be carried out by a qualified botanist approved by authorities.  The condition of the tree-protection zone, if any, should be regularly checked.

11.4.5                               Monitoring for Tung Chung Stream EIS and Wong Lung Hang EIS

For protection of Tung Chung Stream and verifying the effectiveness of mitigation measures, monitoring on Tung Chung Stream is recommended for public works in or near Tung Chung Stream, including construction of River Park (together with revitalization of channelized section of Tung Chung Stream), road crossings spanning over Tung Chung Stream, polders, and stormwater attenuation and treatment ponds. The monitoring should include pre-construction baseline survey, construction phase monitoring and post-construction monitoring.  The monitoring items should cover the environment of the stream courses, the water quality, and the stream fauna. During the works period of road crossings and the river park, monitoring shall be undertaken to identify and evaluate any impacts with appropriate actions taken as required to address and minimise any adverse impact found.

As the proposed River Park will have construction works inside Tung Chung Stream for revitalizing the channelized section, pre-construction (baseline) monitoring shall be carried out on a monthly basis for a 12-month duration. The duration of baseline monitoring for other public works (road crossings, polders, and stormwater attenuation and treatment ponds) shall not be less than 6 months and covering wet season. The construction phase monitoring shall cover the full construction programme on a monthly basis.  The post-construction monitoring shall cover a 12 month duration after the completion on a monthly basis. (see Table 11.1).

Table 11.1      Monitoring of Measures to Minimize Impacts to Tung Chung Stream

Phase

Methodology

Pre-construction (Baseline) (12-month duration for River Park; at least 6-month and covering wet season for other public works)

Monthly quantitative replicate surveys of the environment of the stream courses, the water quality, and the stream fauna using standardized methodology at fixed points, the number of which should be determined prior to the first monitoring event.

Construction (cover the full construction programme)

Monthly quantitative replicate surveys of the environment of the stream courses, the water quality, and the stream fauna using standardized methodology at the fixed points determined in the pre-construction phase.

Post-construction (cover a 12 month duration after the completion)

Monthly quantitative replicate surveys of the environment of the stream courses, the water quality, and the stream fauna using standardized methodology at the fixed points determined in the pre-construction phase.

Action and limit levels, which should take into account the species and season, for construction phase will be established with reference to baseline survey data. The responses when triggering theses limits are outlined in Table 11.2 below.

Table 11.2      Action and Limit Levels and Responses to Evidence of Declines in Aquatic Fauna

Action Level

Response

Limit Level

Response

Construction Phase

Non-compliance of Action Level to be established after baseline monitoring, (such as reduction in taxa diversity or abundance), such that response is triggered.

Investigate cause and if cause identified as related to Project instigate remedial action to remove or reduce source of disturbance

Non-compliance of Limit Level to be established after baseline monitoring, (such as reduction in taxa diversity as well as abundance), such that Limit Level response is triggered.

Investigate cause and if caused identified as related to Project instigate further remedial action.

Monitoring of stream fauna includes fish and aquatic invertebrate, methodology should follow standard methods of direct observation and active search.  The frequency should be monthly.

In order to verify the effectiveness of mitigation measures of Wong Lung Hang during the construction of Service Reservoirs, monitoring on Wong Lung Hang is recommended.  The monitoring approach should follow the methods adopted for other public works (road crossings, polders, and stormwater attenuation and treatment ponds) near Tung Chung Stream.

11.4.6                               Eco-shoreline Monitoring

The colonisation and establishment of fauna and/or flora on the eco-shoreline at TCE PDA and Road P1 reclamation should be monitored.  Marine ecosystems are expected to be enhanced by the eco-shoreline, and hence monitoring of the eco-shoreline shall include quantitative ecological survey methods and measurements of water quality parameters, and cover dry and wet seasons.  As it is expected that this measure will also benefit fisheries species in the marine ecosystems, besides ecological components, the monitoring should also include monitoring on fisheries resources (in particular the recruitments of fisheries species).  Monitoring shall be conducted for at least 3 years after the completion of reclamation works, twice in wet season and twice in dry season, in order to determine the effectiveness of the eco-shoreline.  Reference sites shall be selected in nearby artificial seawalls, to be monitored following the same methods, to facilitate comparisons and evaluation of effectiveness.  The need of extension of monitoring will be reviewed upon completion of the monitoring and subject to the findings of the monitoring surveys.

The details of the monitoring requirements, methodology and programme will be proposed in accordance with the design and targets of the eco-shoreline, with the submission of the Eco-Shoreline Design Study.

Marine ecosystems includes intertidal communities and subtidal hard substrate communities, which should be conducted both qualitatively and quantitatively.  Species and abundance of biota should be recorded.  Diversity index and evenness index should be provided for evaluation and comparison purposes.

Parameters for water quality monitoring include dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved oxygen saturation (DO%), temperature, turbidity, salinity, pH and suspended solids (SS), and the measure methodology could make reference to Water Quality monitoring.

Regarding the monitoring of fisheries recruitment, it is recommended the monitoring survey should be monthly covering May to August (the spawning periods of marine fishes).  The principal sampling method may involve the use of small seine net or plankton net.  Other sampling methods such as fish cages, tidal nets and night-time survey could also be considered and recommended where appropriateReference sites shall be selected in nearby locations, to be monitored following the same methods, to facilitate comparisons and evaluation of effectiveness.

11.4.7                               Tung Chung Bay and Tai Ho Wan Monitoring

Though Tung Chung Bay is not being directly impacted by the Project, given the high ecological importance of Tung Chung Bay, ecological monitoring should be provided for the bay, including baseline monitoring before reclamation, construction phase monitoring during the reclamation process, and post-construction monitoring.

The monitoring will be conducted on the intertidal soft shore habitats, especially where horseshoe crab juveniles and seagrass beds have been sighted.  The soft shore ecological monitoring details are described below.

Monitoring Methodology

The soft shore ecological monitoring will consist of qualitative walk-through surveys, quantitative transect surveys and sedimentation rate monitoring at the accessible survey locations of Tung Chung Bay and Tai Ho Wan as shown in Figure 11.1.

For qualitative walk-through surveys, the accessible shoreline of Tung Chung Bay and Tai Ho Wan at each of the three shore heights: 2 m, 1.5 m and 1 m above Chart Datum will be surveyed, and organisms encountered will be recorded and their relative abundance noted.  In particular, active search of horseshoe crabs and seagrasses will be conducted to confirm whether these species are present along the sites. 

For quantitative transect survey, one 50 – 100 m horizontal (belt) transects (actual length subject to the site conditions) will be surveyed at each of the three shore heights: 2 m, 1.5 m and 1 m above Chart Datum of each survey location.  On each transect, five quadrats (50 cm x 50 cm) will be placed randomly in each transect to assess the abundance and distribution of flora and fauna.  For each quadrat, surface layer to 5 cm depth will be sieved and microbenthic organisms (e.g. crustaceans) will be recorded and identified.  Density of organisms will be expressed as individuals / m2.  Areas with seagrass will also be recorded and identified and other information, such as the percentage cover, will also be recorded.  Sessile animals such as barnacles and oysters in each quadrat will not be counted but estimated as percentage cover on the rock surface.  All species of algae (encrusting, foliose and filamentous) will also be identified and recorded by estimating the percentage cover on the rock surface.  All organisms will be identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level (at least Genus level).  Species encountered outside the quadrat but in the vicinity of survey transect will also be recorded.

For sedimentation rate monitoring, to avoid disturbance to the mudflat and nuisance to navigation, no fixed marker/monitoring rod was installed at the monitoring stations.  A high precision Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) real time location fixing system (or equivalent technology) will be used to locate the station in the precision of 1 mm, which is reasonable under flat mudflat topography with uneven mudflat surface only at micro level.   

Measurements will be taken directly on the mudflat surface.  The Real Time Kinematic GNSS (RTK GNSS) surveying technology will be used to measure mudflat surface levels and 3D coordinates of a survey point.  The RTK GNSS survey will be calibrated against a reference station in the field before and after each survey.  The reference station is a survey control point established by the Lands Department of the HKSAR Government or traditional land surveying methods using professional surveying instruments such as total station, level and/or geodetic global navigation satellite system.  The coordinates system is in HK1980 GRID system.  The reference control station will be surveyed and established by traditional land surveying methods using professional surveying instruments such as total station, level and/or geodetic GNSS.  The accuracy will be down to mm level and higher than the proposed RTK GNSS cm level so that the reference control station has relatively higher accuracy.  As the reference control station has higher accuracy, it will be set as true evaluation relative to the RTK GNSS measurement.  All position and height correction will be adjusted and corrected to the reference control station. 

The precision of the measured mudflat surface level reading (vertical precision setting) will be within 10 mm (standard deviation) after averaging the valid survey records of the XYZ HK1980 GRID coordinates.  Each survey record at each station will be computed by averaging at least three measurements that are within the above specified precision setting.  Both digital data logging and written records will be collected in the field.  Field data on station fixing and mudflat surface measurement will be recorded.

Monitoring Frequency

Prior to the commencement of construction works of the Project, baseline soft shore ecological monitoring will be conducted once at each survey location in April / May 2018.

During the marine construction of the Project, soft shore ecological monitoring will be conducted quarterly at each survey location covering wet and dry seasons. 

Soft shore ecological monitoring will be conducted quarterly at each survey location covering wet and dry seasons in the post-construction phase at least for 2 year after completion of construction.

Event and Action Plan

If the impact monitoring results indicate that the density or the distribution pattern of intertidal fauna and seagrasses has changed, the ET should inform AFCD and investigate the possible causes of the change.  Appropriate actions should be recommended and additional mitigation measures should be implemented as necessary.  The monitoring results should be made available within a reasonable short period to be agreed with the EPD, ER and IEC. 

The Action and Limit levels and event-action plan for mudflat monitoring are not determined in this manual but will be proposed by Ecologist or respective specialists of the Environmental Team based upon the baseline monitoring data, agreed by AFCD and EPD.

12                                           Fisheries

12.1                                     Introduction

The construction and operation of the Project would cause certain fishing ground loss. Permanent loss of about 149.2 ha of fishing ground of low production rate would constitute the residual impact.  Due to the small number of fishing vessels and the limited fisheries production affected, the residual impact is considered acceptable.  The present Project would only be a smaller contributor among all concurrent projects on the cumulative fishing ground loss.  The loss of 149.2 ha fishing ground from the present Project would be about 8.2 % of the anticipated 1,800 ha cumulative fishing ground loss.

The EIA has considered avoidance and minimization for the impacts arising from the Project, including the following:

12.1.1                               Considerations for Impact Avoidance

The Assessment Area is located in waters off North Lantau and there is no fishpond or mariculture site within the Project footprint. The locations of the proposed PDA at TCE reclamation is not located in waters of high fisheries production or fish fry collection, and also away from the identified sites of fisheries importance such as the spawning and nursery grounds for fisheries species in North Lantau waters.

12.1.2                               Considerations for Impact Minimisation

Revealed from reviewed literatures, the marine waters within the Project Area are not identified as important fish spawning or nursery grounds, or support high fish production.  The nearest mariculture site is Ma Wan FCZ, which is about 10 km from the Project Area.

The EIA concluded that the impact of direct loss and indirect disturbance of fishing grounds due to the Project was relatively minor.

12.2                                     Mitigation Measures

The construction and operation of the Project would cause certain fishing ground loss.  During the construction phase, a 200 ha of marine works area will be established, and the marine works area is not available for fishing operations for an about 6 year duration.  During the operation phase, while part of marine works area will be released, there will be inevitable permanent losses of fishing grounds due to the reclamation footprint and the marine waters within the future marinaA total of 149.2 ha fishing ground will be permanently lossThe impact is considered Minor during both construction and operation phases given the loss area is a minor proportion compared with the available fishing ground in Hong Kong waters and the loss area is not of high fisheries production rate.  Eco-shoreline will be provided on the future reclamation seawalls as mitigation on marine ecology.  But it is expected that fisheries species in North Lantau will also be benefited by the enhanced ecological functions.

The present Project would only be a smaller contributor among all concurrent projects on the cumulative fishing ground loss.  The loss of 149.2 ha fishing ground from the present Project would be about 8.2 % of the anticipated 1,800 ha cumulative fishing ground loss.

Permanent loss of about 149.2ha of fishing ground of low production rate would constitute the residual impact.  Due to low to moderate number of fishing vessels and the limited fisheries production affected, the residual impact is considered acceptable.  The operational phase hydrodynamic modelling works has also taken into account concurrent projects, and the results indicated no significant water quality impact during the operational phase is anticipated.  Adverse residual fisheries impact is not anticipated from the present Project.

Recommended mitigation measures for water quality for the construction phase that would minimise and mitigate the potential impacts on fishing grounds and mariculture sites in North Lantau waters have been proposed in the water quality assessment of the present EIA report.  Besides the recommended mitigation measures for water quality stated in the water quality assessment, no further mitigation measures were necessary.

12.3                                     Monitoring Requirements

There will be a water quality monitoring programme for the construction of the project to safeguard the marine water quality in the area.  There will also be a monitoring programme for the eco-shoreline which is an ecological mitigation in Chapter 9 of this EIA Report.  The colonisation and establishment of fauna and/or flora on the eco-shoreline at TCE PDA reclamation will be monitored after the eco-shoreline is completed.  As it is expected that this measure will also benefit fisheries species in the marine ecosystems, the monitoring programme will also include, besides ecological surveys, water quality monitoring and fisheries resource monitoring (in particular the recruitments of fisheries species).  Other than these, no other specific fisheries EM&A programme would be required.

12.4                                     Audit Requirements

Audit requirements would follow those for water quality and general site practices.

13                                           Landscape and Visual Impact

13.1                                     Introduction

The EIA has recommended EM&A for landscape and visual mitigation measures to be undertaken during the design, construction and operational stages of the project.  The design, implementation and maintenance of landscape mitigation measures is a key aspect of this and should be checked to ensure that they are fully realised and that potential conflicts between the proposed landscape measures and any other project works and operational requirements are resolved at the earliest possible date and without compromise to the intention of the mitigation measures.  In addition, implementation of the mitigation measures recommended by the EIA will be monitored through the site audit programme.

13.2                                     Mitigation Measures

The Landscape and Visual Assessment of the EIA proposes a number of mitigation measures to ameliorate the landscape and visual impacts of the Project.  These measures are listed in Table 13.1 below and implementation is summarised in the EMIS in Appendix 4.1.

Table 13.1       Mitigation Measures for Landscape and Visual Impacts

Code

Summary Description

Mitigate Landscape Impacts

Mitigate Visual Impacts

Construction Phase

MM1

Optimization of Construction Areas & Providing Temporary Landscape on Temporary Construction

MM2

Minimize Topographical Changes

MM3

Preservation of Potentially Registerable OVTs, Rare and Protective Vegetation

 

MM4

Transplanting of Existing Trees

 

MM5

Screen Hoarding

 

MM6

Adopting Non-dredge Method for the Reclamation

 

MM7

Protection of Natural Rivers and Streams

 

MM8

Preservation of Natural Coastline

 

MM9

Providing Natural Rock Material/ Planting for Artificial Seawall

Operational Phase

MM10

Compensatory Planting

 

MM11

Woodland Restoration

 

MM12

Screen Planting

MM13

Roadside Planting

MM14

Aesthetic Design of Built Development

 

MM15

Maximise Greening on Structures

MM16

Noise Barrier Design

 

MM17

Landscape Treatment for Polders & Stormwater Attenuation and Treatment Ponds

 

 

 

 

Construction & Operation Phase

MM18

Landscaping on Slopes

MM19

Landscape Treatment on Channelized Watercourses

MM20

Lighting Control

 

 

The landscape and visual mitigation measures proposed should be incorporated in the detailed landscape and engineering design.  Mitigation measures to be implemented during construction should be adopted from the start of construction and be in place throughout the entire construction period.  Mitigation measures to be implemented during operation should be integrated into the detailed design and built as part of the construction works so that they are in place on commissioning of the Project.  Tree transplantation, preservation of Potentially Registerable Old and Valuable Trees (OVTs), Rare and Protective Vegetation, and compensatory planting should be carried out as early as possible in the Project with transplantation carried out prior to construction starting in any particular area.

13.3                                     Baseline Monitoring

The landscape and visual baseline will be determined with reference to the habitat maps included in the EIA Report and detailed tree survey to be completed before the works can commence as well as preliminary site conditions verification surveys.

13.4                                     Environmental Monitoring and Audit Requirement

The design stage EM&A requirements for landscape and visual resources comprise the audit of the detailed landscaping and visual specifications to be prepared during the detailed design together with ensuring that the design is sensitive to landscape and visual impacts.  The landscape and visual auditor shall review the designs as and when they are prepared and liaise with the landscape architect and design engineer to ensure all measures have been incorporated in the design in a format that can be specified to the Contractor for implementation.

Site audits should be undertaken during the construction phase of the Project to check that the proposed landscape and visual mitigation measures are properly implemented and maintained as per their intended objectives. Site inspections should be undertaken by the ET at least once every two weeks during the construction period, preferably by a Registered Landscape Architect (RLA) employed by the Contractor.  Particularly audits should be carried out during site clearance when proposed tree retain, tree felling, and transplantation may occur.  For all soft landscaping work, including measures involving trees such as tree transplantation, compensatory planting and woodland restoration, there should be at least a 24 month establishment period and maintenance which will commence once soft landscaping in an area has been planted.  The broad scope of the audit is detailed below.

·     The extent of the agreed works areas should be regularly checked during the construction phase.  Any trespass by the contractor outside the limit of the works, including any damage to existing trees and woodland shall be noted.

·     The progress of the engineering works should be regularly reviewed on site to identify the earliest practical opportunities for the landscape works to be undertaken.

·     The tree and shrub transplanting and planting operations.

·     Topsoil protection and storage operations.

·     All existing trees and vegetation within the study area which are not directly affected by the works are retained and protected.

·     The methods of protecting existing vegetation proposed by the Contractor are acceptable and enforced.

·     All landscaping works are carried out in accordance with the specifications, with particular attention to approved use of herbicides or pesticides.

·     The species and mix of new plant species to be planted are suitable.

·     The newly planted trees, shrubs and grassed areas are maintained throughout the establishment period, particularly in respect of the following:

n  regular watering, weeding and fertilising of all planting and grass reinstatement;

n  regular grass cutting for reinstated areas;

n  firming up of plants after periods of strong winds or heavy rain;

n  regular checks for and eradication of pests, fungal infection etc.;

n  pruning of dead or broken branches; and

n  prompt replacement of dead plants and re-grassing of failed areas.

The audits during the operational phase will be restricted to the 24 months establishment works of the landscape proposals, with the appropriate agents taking over the maintenance and monitoring after this period as identified in the EIA report.

Table 13.2      Monitoring Programme for Landscape and Visual

Stage

Monitoring Task

Monitoring Report

Form of Approval

Frequency

Design

Monitoring of design works against the recommendations of the landscape and visual impact assessments within the EIA should be undertaken by the Engineer and Landscape Architect, to ensure that they fulfil the intentions of the mitigation measures.  Any changes to the design, including design changes on site should also be checked.

Report by Engineer confirming that the design conforms to requirements of EP.

 

Approval by Project Proponent

At completion of design stage

Construction

Monitoring of the contractor’s operations during the construction period.

Report on Contractor's compliance by ET

Counter-signature of report by IEC

Monthly

Establishment Works

Monitoring of the planting works during the 24-months Establishment Period after completion of the construction works.

Report on Contractor's compliance by ET

 

Counter-signature of report by IEC

Bi-monthly

 

13.5                                     Event and Action Plan

In the event of non-compliance, the responsibilities of the relevant parties are detailed in the Event/Action plan provided in Table 13.3.


Table 13.3      Event and Action Plan for Landscape and Visual

Event

Action

ET

IEC

ER

Contractor

Design Check

1. Check final design conforms to the requirements of EP and prepare report.

1. Check report.

2. Recommend remedial design if necessary.

 

1. Undertake remedial design if necessary.

 

Non-conformity on one occasion

1. Inform the IEC, ER and the Contractor

2. Discuss remedial actions with IEC, ER and Contractor

3. Monitor remedial actions until rectification has been completed

1. Check report.

2. Check Contractor’s working method

3. Discuss with ET, ER and Contractor on possible remedial measures.

4. Advise ER on effective of proposed remedial measures.

5. Check implementation of remedial measures

 

1. Confirm receipt of notification of non-conformity in writing

2. Review and agree on the remedial measures proposed by the Contractor

3. Ensure remedial measures are properly implemented

1. Identify source and investigate the non-conformity

2. Amend working methods agreed with ER as appropriate

3. Rectify damage and undertake any necessary replacement

Repeated Non-conformity

1. Identify sources

2. Inform the Contractor, IEC and ER

3. Discuss inspection frequency

4. Discuss remedial actions with IEC, ER and Contractor

5. Monitor remedial actions until rectification has been completed

6. If non-conformity stops, cease additional monitoring

1. Check inspection report

2. Check Contractor’s working method

3. Discuss with ET,ER and Contractor on possible remedial measures

4. Advise ER on effectiveness of proposed remedial measures

 

1. Notify the Contractor

2. In consultation with the ET and IEC, agree with the Contractor on the remedial measures to be implemented

3. Supervise implementation of remedial measures

 

1. Identify source and investigate the non-conformity

2. Amend working methods agreed with ER as appropriate

3. Rectify damage and undertake any necessary replacement. Stop relevant portion of works as determined by ER until the non-conformity is abated.

 

 


14                                         Impact on Cultural Heritage

14.1                                     Terrestrial Archaeology

14.1.1                               Introduction

The assessment has considered both the construction and operational phases of the project.

14.1.2                               Mitigation Measures

Construction Phase

According to the archaeological potential identified in Section 12.5 of EIA report, the recommendations for corresponding development clusters are summarised in Table 14.1 below.

Table 14.1      Summary of Recommendations for Development Clusters in TCW

Cluster

Area surveyed

Archaeological Potential

Recommendations

Future Owner

TCV-1

Partly

High.

A rescue excavation after land resumption and prior to construction works is recommended for all areas within Sha Tsui Tau Site of Archaeological Interest affected by developing works in residential cluster TCV-1,  facilities TCV-i, TCV-j and TCV-k as well as commercial lots COM-1 and COM-2. This recommendation also includes the respective access road to TCV-1 (NBA).

For the western part of TCV-1 and Sha Tsui Tau Site of Archaeological Interest a Survey-cum-rescue excavation after land resumption and prior to construction works is recommended.

For the DO to the north of TCV-1, the archaeological potential is also considered as high.  However, most of this DO would be maintained as its current use and only minimal works would be conducted there.  Hence, it is recommended that a Watching Brief with an archaeologist supervising any small scale excavation for utilities works etc. would be required.

 

Private residual developer

TCV-i

Exempted*

High.

 

Government

TCV-j

 

 

 

Government

TCV-k

 

 

 

Government

COM-1

 

 

 

Private developer

COM-2

Partly

High due to proximity to Sha Tsui Tau Site of Archaeological Interest and previous results.

 

Private developer

COM-3

Yes

High due to proximity to Sha Tsui Tau Site of Archaeological Interest and previous results.

A Survey-cum-rescue excavation is recommended after land resumption and prior to construction works for commercial building cluster COM-3.

Private developer

TCV-2

Yes

High in south-western portion due to finds in TP14 and results of previous investigations. The remaining parts are considered low.

Further survey focusing around TP-14 and the low ridge in the south-western part of TCV-2 is recommended after land resumption and prior to any construction works.

In all other areas of TCV-2, no further action is required.

Private residual developer

TCV-d

Yes

Low.

No further action is required.

Government

TCV-e

Yes

Medium due to finds in TP-13 and proximity to TCV-1.

Watching brief during excavation of TCV-e is recommended.

Government

TCV-3

No

Low.

No further action is required.

Private residual developer

TCV-a

No

 

 

Government

TCV-4

Yes

Low due to heavy re-modelling of slopes.

No further action is required.

 

Private residual developer

TCV-b

Yes

 

 

Government

TCV-5a

Yes

Low due to considerable disturbances.

No further action is required.

Private residual developer

TCV-c

Yes

 

 

Government

TCV-5b

Yes

Medium.

A watching brief during the construction phase is recommended for TCV-5b and access road between TCV-5a and 5b.

Private residual developer

Access road

Yes

 

 

Government

TCV-6

Yes

Low due to dumping and to slope works east of TCV-6.

No further action is required.

 

Private residual developer

TCV-l

No

Destroyed.

 

Government

TCV-7

No

Low.

No further action is required.

 

Private residual developer

TCV-n

No

Destroyed.

No further action is required.

Government

TCV-8

Yes

High due to finds in TP 04 and site location comparable in terms of natural landscape and topology to Cheung Shue Tan near Chinese University. The south-western part was noted to be sterile and hence of low potential.

Further survey is recommended on lower terrace around TP 04 after land resumption and prior to any construction works. This also affects the access road leading into TCV-8.

No further action is required for the south-western part of TCV-8.

Private residual developer

Access road into TCV-8

Yes

 

 

Government

TCV-f

Yes

Low.

Since facility TCV-f is planned with a small nullah, no further action is required.

Government

TCV-g

Yes

High due potentially favourable settlement conditions along former coastal area.

Further survey is recommended on the plan in and around TCV-g after land resumption and prior to any construction works.

Government

Access road along

south side

Yes

Low.

No further action is required.

 

Government

TCW-1

Yes

Low due to considerable disturbances.

No further action is required.

 

Private residual developer

TCW-2

No

Medium due to the possible finds near the youth camp and also unsolved whereabouts of a second Tung Chung battery site.

Further survey in form of one or two test pits could be excavated in lot of youth camp after land resumption and prior to construction works.

Private residual developer

Access road into TCW-2

No

 

 

Government

TCW-a

Exempted*

Low.

No further action required.

Government

TCW-3

No

Destroyed.

No further action required.

Private residual developer

TCW-b

 

 

 

Government

TCW-c

 

 

 

Government

Note:

* The whole development cluster is proposed within the Site of Archaeological Interest which has been studied in previous studies and hence the area is not included in this survey.  As there is only relatively smaller scale of works anticipated to be carried out at the other development areas including CA, CPA, GB, V, AGR, RO/DO, IC and OU, terrestrial archaeological impact is not anticipated and thus recommendation is not required.

The above mentioned recommendations are graphically summarised in Figure 14.1.  Red shaded areas are areas where further archaeological investigations after land resumption and prior to any construction works are needed.  Yellow shaded areas are areas where further action in form of watching briefs during construction works are recommended.  Green shaded areas are areas where no further action is required.  Blue shaded areas are other development areas (CA, CPA, GB, V, AGR, RO/DO, IC and OU zonings with minor works) where no further action is required.

The recommendations on archaeological investigation can be classified in three categories:

1.       Rescue excavations where previous findings could be confirmed with this survey and where data is sufficient to exactly locate and define the extent of necessary works. Affected areas are Sha Tsui Tau Site of Archaeological Interest including eastern parts of cluster TCV-1, facilities TCV-i to TCV-k as well as commercial clusters COM-1 and 2;

2.       Survey-cum-rescue excavations are subdivided procedures. An initial advanced survey as integral part of the works helps to complete data and to better locate and design the follow-up rescue excavations. Survey-cum-rescue excavations are recommended for western parts of cluster TCV-1 and for commercial cluster COM-3; and 

3.       Further surveys, where additional (enlarged) test pits are recommended without the imminent need of a follow-up rescue excavations are recommended for parts of clusters TCV-2 and TCV-8 as well as clusters TCW-2 and TCV-g. Further surveys will be conducted prior to the commencement of any construction works; and mitigation measures will be formulated based on the findings of further surveys in prior consultation with AMO before the construction phase of the Project.

The project proponent should be aware of the protection of items of archaeological or historic significance according to the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance. Should finds be discovered: 1) during the additional archaeological investigation after land resumption and prior to construction works; 2) during the watching brief during the construction phase of the project; or 3) where construction works can commence without further action being necessary, the AMO has to be contacted immediately for further agreement on practical and feasible handling procedures.

Operation Phase

As mentioned in Section 12.6 of EIA report, no adverse impact is anticipated for marine archaeology and thus no further action or mitigation is required.

14.2                                     Marine Archaeology

14.2.1                               Introduction

The assessment has considered both the construction and operational phases of the project.

14.2.2                               Mitigation Measures

Construction Phase

As marine archaeological resource was not identified during the diver survey, no further action or mitigation is thus required.

Operation Phase

As mentioned in Section 12.6 of EIA report, no adverse impact is anticipated for marine archaeology and thus no further action or mitigation is required.

14.3                                     Built Heritage

14.3.1                               Introduction

The assessment has considered both the construction and operational phases of the project.

14.3.2                               Mitigation Measures

Construction Phase

As mentioned in Section 12.4 of EIA report, all the identified built heritage items within the vicinity of TCW are located in land use zonings of the RODP in which large scale development is not proposed, impacts on these items is not anticipated and thus no further action or mitigation is required.

Operation Phase

As mentioned in Section 12.6 of EIA report, no development will be proposed on all existing built heritage items and they will be retained as they are, no adverse impact is anticipated and thus no further action or mitigation is required.

15                                           Site Environmental Audit

15.1                                     Site Inspection

Site inspection provides a direct means to initiate and enforce specified environmental protection and pollution control measures.  These shall be undertaken routinely to inspect construction activities in order to ensure that appropriate environmental protection and pollution control mitigation measures are properly implemented.  Site inspection is one of the most effective tools to enforce the environmental protection requirements at the works area.

The ET shall be responsible for formulating the environmental site inspection programme as well as the deficiency and action reporting system, and for carrying out the site inspections.  The proposal for rectification, if any, should be prepared and submitted to the ET Leader and IEC by the Contractor.

Regular site inspections shall be carried out and led by the ER and attended by the Contractor and ET at least once per week during the construction phase.  The areas of inspection shall not be limited to the environmental situation, pollution control and mitigation measures within the site.  It should also review the environmental situations outside the works area which is likely to be affected, directly or indirectly, by the construction site activities of the Project.  The ET shall make reference to the following information in conducting the inspection.  During the inspection, the following information should be referred to:

(i) EIA Report recommendations on environmental protection and pollution control mitigation measures;

(ii) works progress and programme;

(iii)         individual works methodology proposals (which shall include the proposal on associated pollution control measures);

(iv)         contract specifications on environmental protection;

(v) relevant environmental protection and pollution control legislations; and

(vi)         previous site inspection results.

The Contractor shall keep the ER and ET Leader updated with all relevant environmental related information on the construction contract necessary for him to carry out the site inspections.  Site inspection results and associated recommendations for improvements to the environmental protection and pollution control efforts should be recorded and followed up by the Contractor in an agreed time-frame.  The Contractor shall follow the procedures and time-frame as stipulated in the environmental site inspection, and the deficiency and action reporting system formulated by the ET, to report on any remedial measures subsequent to the site inspections.

The ER, ET and the Contractor should also carry out ad-hoc site inspections if significant environmental problems are identified. Inspections may also be required subsequent to receipt of a valid environmental complaint, or as part of the investigation work, as specified in the Action Plan for the EM&A programme.

15.2                                     Environmental Compliance

There are statutory requirements on environmental protection and pollution control requirements with which construction activities must comply.

In order to ensure the works comply with corresponding requirements, all method statements of works should be submitted by the Contractor to the ER for approval and to the ET Leader to ensure sufficient environmental protection and pollution control measures have been included.  The Environmental Mitigation Implementation schedule (EMIS) is summarised in Appendix 4.1.  Any proposed changes to the mitigation measures shall be certified by the ET Leader and verified by the IEC as conforming to the relevant information and recommendations contained in the EIA Report.

The ER and ET shall also review the progress and programme of the works to check that relevant environmental legislations have not been violated, and that any foreseeable potential for violating laws can be prevented.

The Contractor should provide the update of the relevant documents to the ET Leader so that checking can be carried out.  The document shall at least include the updated Works Progress Reports, updated Works Programme, method statements, any application letters for different licences / permits under the environmental protection laws, and copies of all valid licences / permits.  The site diary and environmental records shall also be available for inspection by the relevant parties.

After reviewing the document, the ET shall advise the IEC and Contractor of any non-compliance with legislative requirements on environmental protection and pollution control so that they can timely take follow-up actions as appropriate.  If the follow-up actions may still result in potential violation of environmental protection and pollution control requirements, the ER and ET should provide further advice to the Contractor to take remedial action to resolve the problem.

Upon receipt of the advice, the Contractor shall undertake immediate actions to correct the situation.  The ER and ET shall follow up to ensure that appropriate action has been taken in order to satisfy legal requirements.

15.3                                     Choice of Construction Method

At times during the construction phase the Contractor may submit method statements for various aspects of construction.  This state of affairs would only apply to those construction methods that the EIA has not imposed conditions while for construction methods that have been assessed in the EIA,